cultivate


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cul·ti·vate

 (kŭl′tə-vāt′)
tr.v. cul·ti·vat·ed, cul·ti·vat·ing, cul·ti·vates
1.
a. To improve and prepare (land), as by plowing or fertilizing, for raising crops; till.
b. To loosen or dig soil around (growing plants).
2. To grow or tend (a plant or crop).
3. To promote the growth of (a biological culture).
4. To encourage or foster: cultivate a respect for the law. See Synonyms at nurture.
5. To acquire, develop, or refine, as by education: cultivating a posh accent.
6. To seek the acquaintance or goodwill of; make friends with: cultivated the club's new members.

[Medieval Latin cultīvāre, cultīvāt-, from cultīvus, tilled, from Latin cultus, past participle of colere, to till; see kwel- in Indo-European roots.]

cul′ti·vat′a·ble adj.

cultivate

(ˈkʌltɪˌveɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Agriculture) to till and prepare (land or soil) for the growth of crops
2. (Agriculture) to plant, tend, harvest, or improve (plants) by labour and skill
3. (Agriculture) to break up (land or soil) with a cultivator or hoe
4. to improve or foster (the mind, body, etc) as by study, education, or labour
5. to give special attention to: to cultivate a friendship; to cultivate a hobby.
6. to give or bring culture to (a person, society, etc); civilize
7. (Biology) biology to grow cells, bacteria, etc in a culture
[C17: from Medieval Latin cultivāre to till, from Old French cultiver, from Medieval Latin cultīvus cultivable, from Latin cultus cultivated, from colere to till, toil over]

cul•ti•vate

(ˈkʌl təˌveɪt)

v.t. -vat•ed, -vat•ing.
1. to prepare and work on (land) in order to raise crops; till.
2. to use a cultivator on.
3. to promote or improve the growth of (a plant or crop) by labor and attention.
4. to produce by culture: to cultivate a strain of bacteria.
5. to develop or improve by education or training: to cultivate a talent.
6. to promote the growth or development of (an art, science, etc.).
7. to devote oneself to (an art, science, etc.).
8. to seek to promote or foster (friendship, love, etc.).
9. to seek the acquaintance or friendship of (a person).
[1610–20; < Medieval Latin cultīvātus, past participle of cultīvāre to till, derivative of cultīvus cultivable (Latin cult(us), past participle of colere to care for, till + -īvus -ive)]

cultivate


Past participle: cultivated
Gerund: cultivating

Imperative
cultivate
cultivate
Present
I cultivate
you cultivate
he/she/it cultivates
we cultivate
you cultivate
they cultivate
Preterite
I cultivated
you cultivated
he/she/it cultivated
we cultivated
you cultivated
they cultivated
Present Continuous
I am cultivating
you are cultivating
he/she/it is cultivating
we are cultivating
you are cultivating
they are cultivating
Present Perfect
I have cultivated
you have cultivated
he/she/it has cultivated
we have cultivated
you have cultivated
they have cultivated
Past Continuous
I was cultivating
you were cultivating
he/she/it was cultivating
we were cultivating
you were cultivating
they were cultivating
Past Perfect
I had cultivated
you had cultivated
he/she/it had cultivated
we had cultivated
you had cultivated
they had cultivated
Future
I will cultivate
you will cultivate
he/she/it will cultivate
we will cultivate
you will cultivate
they will cultivate
Future Perfect
I will have cultivated
you will have cultivated
he/she/it will have cultivated
we will have cultivated
you will have cultivated
they will have cultivated
Future Continuous
I will be cultivating
you will be cultivating
he/she/it will be cultivating
we will be cultivating
you will be cultivating
they will be cultivating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cultivating
you have been cultivating
he/she/it has been cultivating
we have been cultivating
you have been cultivating
they have been cultivating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cultivating
you will have been cultivating
he/she/it will have been cultivating
we will have been cultivating
you will have been cultivating
they will have been cultivating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cultivating
you had been cultivating
he/she/it had been cultivating
we had been cultivating
you had been cultivating
they had been cultivating
Conditional
I would cultivate
you would cultivate
he/she/it would cultivate
we would cultivate
you would cultivate
they would cultivate
Past Conditional
I would have cultivated
you would have cultivated
he/she/it would have cultivated
we would have cultivated
you would have cultivated
they would have cultivated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.cultivate - foster the growth of
farming, husbandry, agriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
farm, produce, raise, grow - cultivate by growing, often involving improvements by means of agricultural techniques; "The Bordeaux region produces great red wines"; "They produce good ham in Parma"; "We grow wheat here"; "We raise hogs here"
2.cultivate - prepare for crops; "Work the soil"; "cultivate the land"
farming, husbandry, agriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
gear up, prepare, ready, set, fix, set up - make ready or suitable or equip in advance for a particular purpose or for some use, event, etc; "Get the children ready for school!"; "prepare for war"; "I was fixing to leave town after I paid the hotel bill"
knead, work - make uniform; "knead dough"; "work the clay until it is soft"
overcrop, overcultivate - to exhaust by excessive cultivation; "the farmers overcropped the land"
3.cultivate - teach or refine to be discriminative in taste or judgment; "Cultivate your musical taste"; "Train your tastebuds"; "She is well schooled in poetry"
fine-tune, refine, polish, down - improve or perfect by pruning or polishing; "refine one's style of writing"
sophisticate - make less natural or innocent; "Their manners had sophisticated the young girls"
4.cultivate - adapt (a wild plant or unclaimed land) to the environment; "domesticate oats"; "tame the soil"
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
adapt, accommodate - make fit for, or change to suit a new purpose; "Adapt our native cuisine to the available food resources of the new country"

cultivate

verb
1. farm, work, plant, tend, till, harvest, plough, bring under cultivation She cultivated a small garden of her own.
2. develop, establish, acquire, foster, devote yourself to, pursue Try to cultivate a positive mental attitude.
3. court, associate with, seek out, run after, consort with, butter up, dance attendance upon, seek someone's company or friendship, take trouble or pains with He only cultivates people who may be of use to him.
4. foster, further, forward, encourage She went out of her way to cultivate his friendship.
5. improve, better, train, discipline, polish, refine, elevate, enrich, civilize My father encouraged me to cultivate my mind.

cultivate

verb
1. To prepare (soil) for the planting and raising of crops:
2. To bring into existence and foster the development of:
3. To promote and sustain the development of:
Translations
يَزرَع، يُرَبّييَفْلَح، يَحْرُث الأرض
obdělávat půdupěstovat
dyrkekultivereudvikle
herättääviljellä
brjóta land til ræktunarrækta
apdirbimasauginimasdirbamasdirbimasdirbti
audzētkultivēt
gojitiobdelovati
tarlayı sürüp ekmeküretmekyetiştirmek

cultivate

[ˈkʌltɪveɪt] VT
1. [+ crop, land, friendships] → cultivar
2. (fig) [+ habit] → cultivar

cultivate

[ˈkʌltɪveɪt] vt
[+ ground, fields] → cultiver; [+ plants, crops] → cultiver
(= develop) [+ one's image] → cultiver; [+ one's reputation] → entretenir, cultiver; [+ friendship, relationship] → cultiver; [+ person] → cultiver; [+ habit, sense of humour, talent] → cultiver

cultivate

vt
(lit)kultivieren; soilbebauen, kultivieren; crop, fruit etcanbauen; beardwachsen lassen
(fig) friendship, links etcpflegen, kultivieren; art, skill, tasteentwickeln; sbsich (dat)warmhalten (inf), → die Beziehung zu … pflegen; a connection like that is definitely worth cultivatinges lohnt sich bestimmt, so eine Verbindung aufrechtzuerhalten; to cultivate one’s mindsich bilden

cultivate

[ˈkʌltɪˌveɪt] vt (also) (fig) → coltivare

cultivate

(ˈkaltiveit) verb
1. to prepare (land) for crops.
2. to grow (a crop in a garden, field etc). He cultivates mushrooms in the cellar.
ˈcultivated adjective
1. (of fields etc) prepared for crops; used for growing crops. cultivated land.
2. grown in a garden etc; not wild. a cultivated variety of raspberries.
3. having good manners; educated. a cultivated young lady; He has cultivated tastes in music.
ˌcultiˈvation noun
ˈcultivator noun
a tool or machine for breaking up ground and removing weeds.

cultivate

vt. cultivar; estudiar.
References in classic literature ?
Believing that they could not begin too early to cultivate energy, industry, and independence, their parents consented, and both fell to work with the hearty good will which in spite of all obstacles is sure to succeed at last.
Marek was strong, and Ambrosch worked him hard; but he could never teach him to cultivate corn, I remember.
On leaving her, after my first outbreak, I had of course returned to my pupils, associating the right remedy for my dismay with that sense of their charm which I had already found to be a thing I could positively cultivate and which had never failed me yet.
No: the reason was this: that from the fatal experiences of the fishery there hung a terrible prestige of perilousness about such a whale as there did about Rinaldo Rinaldini, insomuch that most fishermen were content to recognise him by merely touching their tarpaulins when he would be discovered lounging by them on the sea, without seeking to cultivate a more intimate acquaintance.
This lady, having gathered, from George's conversation, that he was from Kentucky, seemed evidently disposed to cultivate his acquaintance; in which design she was seconded by the graces of her little girl, who was about as pretty a plaything as ever diverted the weariness of a fortnight's trip on a steamboat.
It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.
I like cultured society, and I shall cultivate your acquaintance.
The garden was a wide inclosure, surrounded with walls so high as to exclude every glimpse of prospect; a covered verandah ran down one side, and broad walks bordered a middle space divided into scores of little beds: these beds were assigned as gardens for the pupils to cultivate, and each bed had an owner.
You have been compelled to cultivate your reflective faculties for want of occasions for frittering your life away in silly trifles.
The field of human sympathy, out of which I might have raised the needful pecuniary crop, is closed to me from want of time to cultivate it.
Introduce him to me, and I'll cultivate his acquaintance.
As it is your principle to allow us to exercise our own judgment, we intend to cultivate the acquaintance of Smilash.