culture


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culture
culture of rice blast fungus, Pyricularia grisea, growing in a petri dish

cul·ture

 (kŭl′chər)
n.
1.
a. The arts, beliefs, customs, institutions, and other products of human work and thought considered as a unit, especially with regard to a particular time or social group: Edwardian culture; Japanese culture.
b. These arts, beliefs, and other products considered with respect to a particular subject or mode of expression: musical culture; oral culture.
c. The set of predominating attitudes and behavior that characterize a group or organization: a manager who changed the corporate culture.
2. Mental refinement and sophisticated taste resulting from the appreciation of the arts and sciences: a woman of great culture.
3. Special training and development: voice culture for singers and actors.
4. The cultivation of soil; tillage: the culture of the soil.
5. The breeding or cultivation of animals or plants for food, the improvement of stock, or other purposes.
6. Biology
a. The growing of microorganisms, tissue cells, or other living matter in a specially prepared nutrient medium.
b. Such a growth or colony, as of bacteria.
tr.v. cul·tured, cul·tur·ing, cul·tures
1. To cultivate (soil or plants).
2.
a. To grow (microorganisms or other living matter) in a specially prepared nutrient medium.
b. To use (a substance) as a medium for culture: culture milk.

[Middle English, cultivation, from Old French, from Latin cultūra, from cultus, past participle of colere; see cultivate.]

culture

(ˈkʌltʃə)
n
1. (Sociology) the total of the inherited ideas, beliefs, values, and knowledge, which constitute the shared bases of social action
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the total range of activities and ideas of a group of people with shared traditions, which are transmitted and reinforced by members of the group: the Mayan culture.
3. (Anthropology & Ethnology) a particular civilization at a particular period
4. (Art Terms) the artistic and social pursuits, expression, and tastes valued by a society or class, as in the arts, manners, dress, etc
5. the enlightenment or refinement resulting from these pursuits
6. (Sociology) the attitudes, feelings, values, and behaviour that characterize and inform society as a whole or any social group within it: yob culture.
7. (Agriculture) the cultivation of plants, esp by scientific methods designed to improve stock or to produce new ones
8. (Breeds) stockbreeding the rearing and breeding of animals, esp with a view to improving the strain
9. (Agriculture) the act or practice of tilling or cultivating the soil
10. (Microbiology) biology
a. the experimental growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, in a nutrient substance (culture medium), usually under controlled conditions. See also culture medium
b. a group of microorganisms grown in this way
vb (tr)
11. (Agriculture) to cultivate (plants or animals)
12. (Microbiology) to grow (microorganisms) in a culture medium
[C15: from Old French, from Latin cultūra a cultivating, from colere to till; see cult]
ˈculturist n
ˈcultureless adj

cul•ture

(ˈkʌl tʃər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. artistic and intellectual pursuits and products.
2. a quality of enlightenment or refinement arising from an acquaintance with and concern for what is regarded as excellent in the arts, letters, manners, etc.
3. development or improvement of the mind by education or training.
4. the sum total of ways of living built up by a group of human beings and transmitted from one generation to another.
5. a particular form or stage of civilization, as that of a nation or period: Greek culture.
6. the behaviors and beliefs characteristic of a particular social, ethnic, or age group: youth culture; the drug culture.
7.
a. the cultivation of microorganisms or tissues for scientific study, medicinal use, etc.
b. the product or growth resulting from such cultivation.
8. the act or practice of cultivating the soil.
9. the raising of plants or animals, esp. with a view to their improvement.
v.t.
10. to subject to culture; cultivate.
11.
a. to grow (microorganisms, tissues, etc.) in or on a controlled or defined medium.
b. to introduce (living material) into a culture medium.
[1400–50; (< Anglo-French) < Latin cultūra. See cult, -ure]

cul·ture

(kŭl′chər)
Noun
1. A medium for the growth of microorganisms or a batch of cells under specific conditions in a laboratory.
2. Living material, such as a colony of cells or microorganisms, grown in a culture.
Verb
To grow microorganisms or a batch of cells in a culture.

culture

A feature of the terrain that has been constructed by man. Included are such items as roads, buildings, and canals; boundary lines; and, in a broad sense, all names and legends on a map.

culture


Past participle: cultured
Gerund: culturing

Imperative
culture
culture
Present
I culture
you culture
he/she/it cultures
we culture
you culture
they culture
Preterite
I cultured
you cultured
he/she/it cultured
we cultured
you cultured
they cultured
Present Continuous
I am culturing
you are culturing
he/she/it is culturing
we are culturing
you are culturing
they are culturing
Present Perfect
I have cultured
you have cultured
he/she/it has cultured
we have cultured
you have cultured
they have cultured
Past Continuous
I was culturing
you were culturing
he/she/it was culturing
we were culturing
you were culturing
they were culturing
Past Perfect
I had cultured
you had cultured
he/she/it had cultured
we had cultured
you had cultured
they had cultured
Future
I will culture
you will culture
he/she/it will culture
we will culture
you will culture
they will culture
Future Perfect
I will have cultured
you will have cultured
he/she/it will have cultured
we will have cultured
you will have cultured
they will have cultured
Future Continuous
I will be culturing
you will be culturing
he/she/it will be culturing
we will be culturing
you will be culturing
they will be culturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been culturing
you have been culturing
he/she/it has been culturing
we have been culturing
you have been culturing
they have been culturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been culturing
you will have been culturing
he/she/it will have been culturing
we will have been culturing
you will have been culturing
they will have been culturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been culturing
you had been culturing
he/she/it had been culturing
we had been culturing
you had been culturing
they had been culturing
Conditional
I would culture
you would culture
he/she/it would culture
we would culture
you would culture
they would culture
Past Conditional
I would have cultured
you would have cultured
he/she/it would have cultured
we would have cultured
you would have cultured
they would have cultured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.culture - a particular society at a particular time and placeculture - a particular society at a particular time and place; "early Mayan civilization"
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
society - an extended social group having a distinctive cultural and economic organization
subculture - a social group within a national culture that has distinctive patterns of behavior and beliefs
Aegean civilisation, Aegean civilization, Aegean culture - the prehistoric civilization on the islands in the Aegean sea and the surrounding countries; "by 800 BC the entire Aegean had adopted this style of pottery"
Helladic civilisation, Helladic civilization, Helladic culture - the bronze-age culture of mainland Greece that flourished 2500-1100 BC
Indus civilization - the bronze-age culture of the Indus valley that flourished from about 2600-1750 BC
Minoan civilisation, Minoan civilization, Minoan culture - the bronze-age culture of Crete that flourished 3000-1100 BC
Mycenaean civilisation, Mycenaean civilization, Mycenaean culture - the late bronze-age culture of Mycenae that flourished 1400-1100 BC
Paleo-American culture, Paleo-Amerind culture, Paleo-Indian culture - the prehistoric culture of the earliest human inhabitants of North America and South America
Western civilization, Western culture - the modern culture of western Europe and North America; "when Ghandi was asked what he thought of Western civilization he said he thought it would be a good idea"
2.culture - the tastes in art and manners that are favored by a social group
appreciation, discernment, perceptiveness, taste - delicate discrimination (especially of aesthetic values); "arrogance and lack of taste contributed to his rapid success"; "to ask at that particular time was the ultimate in bad taste"
counterculture - a culture with lifestyles and values opposed to those of the established culture
mass culture - the culture that is widely disseminated via the mass media
letters - the literary culture; "this book shows American letters at its best"
3.culture - all the knowledge and values shared by a society
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
meme - a cultural unit (an idea or value or pattern of behavior) that is passed from one person to another by non-genetic means (as by imitation); "memes are the cultural counterpart of genes"
4.culture - (biology) the growing of microorganisms in a nutrient medium (such as gelatin or agar); "the culture of cells in a Petri dish"
starter - a culture containing yeast or bacteria that is used to start the process of fermentation or souring in making butter or cheese or dough; "to make sourdough you need a starter"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
5.culture - a highly developed state of perfection; having a flawless or impeccable quality; "they performed with great polish"; "I admired the exquisite refinement of his prose"; "almost an inspiration which gives to all work that finish which is almost art"--Joseph Conrad
flawlessness, ne plus ultra, perfection - the state of being without a flaw or defect
6.culture - the attitudes and behavior that are characteristic of a particular social group or organization; "the developing drug culture"; "the reason that the agency is doomed to inaction has something to do with the FBI culture"
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
cyberculture - the culture that emerges from the use of computers for communication and entertainment and business
Kalashnikov culture - the attitudes and behavior in a social group that resolves political disputes by force of arms; "the Kalashnikov culture in Afghanistan"
mosaic culture - a highly diverse culture; "the city's mosaic culture results in great diversity in the arts"
7.culture - the raising of plants or animals; "the culture of oysters"
cultivation - (agriculture) production of food by preparing the land to grow crops (especially on a large scale)
cranberry culture - the cultivation of cranberries
monoculture - the cultivation of a single crop (on a farm or area or country)
tillage - the cultivation of soil for raising crops
viniculture, viticulture - the cultivation of grapes and grape vines; grape growing
Verb1.culture - grow in a special preparation; "the biologist grows microorganisms"
grow - cause to grow or develop; "He grows vegetables in his backyard"

culture

noun
1. the arts France's Minister of Culture and Education
2. civilization, society, customs, way of life people of different cultures
3. lifestyle, habit, way of life, mores Social workers say this has created a culture of dependency.
4. refinement, education, breeding, polish, enlightenment, accomplishment, sophistication, good taste, erudition, gentility, urbanity He was a well-travelled man of culture and breeding.

culture

noun
1. The total product of human creativity and intellect:
2. Enlightenment and excellent taste resulting from intellectual development:
verb
To prepare (soil) for the planting and raising of crops:
Translations
kultuur
استِنْبات بَكْتيريتربية تِجاريّه لِلحَيواناتثقافةثَقَافَةثَقافَه
cultura
kulturapěstováníkultivovat
kulturkulturlivlevevisopdrætdannelse
kulturo
kultuur
فرهنگ
kulttuuriviljely
לתרבתתרבות
संस्कृति
kultura
művelődésműveltségtenyészettermesztés
cultura
eldi, ræktunmenningmenning, menntunörverugróîursiîfágun, menntun, menning
文化培養
문화
cultura
išsilavinimasveisimas
kultūraaudzēšana
സംസ്ക്കാരം
cultură
kultúrapestovanie
kultura
kulturaкултура
kultur
วัฒนธรรม
kültürüretikyetiştirmezevk ve anlayışeğitim
văn hóavăn-hóa

culture

[ˈkʌltʃəʳ]
A. N
1. (= the arts) → cultura f; (= civilization) → civilización f, cultura f
2. (= education, refinement) → cultura f
she has no culturecarece de cultura, es una inculta
3. (Agr) (= breeding) → cría f; [of plants, etc] → cultivo m
B. VT [+ tissue etc] → cultivar
C. CPD culture clash Nchoque m de culturas, choque m cultural
culture fluid Ncaldo m de cultivo
culture gap Nvacío m cultural
culture medium Ncaldo m de cultivo
culture shock Nchoque m cultural
culture vulture N (hum) → cultureta mf

culture

[ˈkʌltʃər] n
(= the arts, philosophy etc) → culture f popular culture
(= society, civilisation) → culture f
(behaviour and beliefs of a particular group)culture f
enterprise culture → culture d'entreprise corporate culture, youth culture
(in laboratory) [cells, bacteria] → culture f

culture

n
Kultur f; physical culture (dated)Körperkultur f (dated); a man of culture/of no cultureein kultivierter/unkultivierter Mann, ein Mann mit/ohne Kultur; to study German culturedie deutsche Kultur studieren; a culture of dependency, a dependency cultureeine Kultur der Abhängigkeit; the company culturedie Unternehmenskultur
(Agr, Biol, Med) → Kultur f; (of animals)Zucht f
vt (Biol, Med) → eine Kultur anlegen von

culture

:
culture fluid
n (Biol, Med) → Nährlösung f
culture gap
nKulturlücke f
culture medium
n (Biol, Med) → Kulturmedium nt, → (künstlicher) Nährboden
culture shock
nKulturschock m
culture vulture
n (hum)Kulturfanatiker(in) m(f)

culture

[ˈkʌltʃəʳ] n
a.cultura; (civilization) → civiltà
b. (Bio, Agr) → coltura

culture

(ˈkaltʃə) noun
1. a form or type of civilization of a certain race or nation. the Jewish culture.
2. improvement of the mind etc by education etc. He was an enthusiastic seeker of culture.
3. educated taste in art, literature, music etc. He thinks that anyone who dislikes Bach is lacking in culture.
4. (a) cultivated growth of bacteria etc.
5. the commercial rearing of fish, certain plants etc.
ˈcultural adjective
ˈcultured adjective
(negative uncultured) well-educated.

culture

ثَقَافَة kultura kultur Kultur πολιτισμός cultura kulttuuri culture kultura cultura 文化 문화 cultuur kultur kultura cultura культура kultur วัฒนธรรม kültür văn hóa 文化

cul·ture

n. cultivo, crecimiento artificial de microorganismos o células de tejido vivo en el laboratorio;
blood ______ de sangre; ___;
___ mediummedio de ___;
tissue ______ de tejido.

culture

n cultura; (micro) cultivo; blood — hemocultivo (form), cultivo de sangre; — of safety (excellence, etc.) cultura de seguridad (excelencia, etc.); stool — coprocultivo (form), cultivo de heces (popó, etc.); throat — cultivo faríngeo (form), cultivo de garganta; urine — urocultivo (form), cultivo de orina; vt cultivar
References in classic literature ?
When the pathless forest that still covered this wild principality should give place--as it inevitably must, though perhaps not till ages hence--to the golden fertility of human culture, it would be the source of incalculable wealth to the Pyncheon blood.
Gilman; and then take Kropotkin's Fields, Factories, and Workshops, and read about the new science of agriculture, which has been built up in the last ten years; by which, with made soils and intensive culture, a gardener can raise ten or twelve crops in a season, and two hundred tons of vegetables upon a single acre; by which the population of the whole globe could be supported on the soil now cultivated in the United States alone
The principle of reliance and unquestioning faith, which is its foundation, is more a native element in this race than any other; and it has often been found among them, that a stray seed of truth, borne on some breeze of accident into hearts the most ignorant, has sprung up into fruit, whose abundance has shamed that of higher and more skilful culture.
The best thing a man can do for his culture when he is rich is to endeavor to carry out those schemes which he entertained when he was poor.
I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil--to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society.
Potter has no imagination, and no great deal of culture, perhaps, but he has a historical mind and a good memory, and so he is the person I depend upon mainly to post me up when I get back from a scout.
A man who has traveled as much as I have, and seen as much of the world, sees it plain enough, but he can't cure it, you know, so the best is to leave it and seek a sphere which is more in harmony with his tastes and culture.
It was fifteen years since Silas Marner had first come to Raveloe; he was then simply a pallid young man, with prominent short-sighted brown eyes, whose appearance would have had nothing strange for people of average culture and experience, but for the villagers near whom he had come to settle it had mysterious peculiarities which corresponded with the exceptional nature of his occupation, and his advent from an unknown region called "North'ard".
Art had taught him to soften the faults of a voice which had little compass, and was naturally rough rather than mellow, and, in short, had done all that culture can do in supplying natural deficiencies.
Modern English polite society, my native sphere, seems to me as corrupt as consciousness of culture and absence of honesty can make it.
Erskine of Treadley, an old gentleman of considerable charm and culture, who had fallen, however, into bad habits of silence, having, as he explained once to Lady Agatha, said everything that he had to say before he was thirty.
Don Quixote laughed at Sancho's affected phraseology, and perceived that what he said about his improvement was true, for now and then he spoke in a way that surprised him; though always, or mostly, when Sancho tried to talk fine and attempted polite language, he wound up by toppling over from the summit of his simplicity into the abyss of his ignorance; and where he showed his culture and his memory to the greatest advantage was in dragging in proverbs, no matter whether they had any bearing or not upon the subject in hand, as may have been seen already and will be noticed in the course of this history.

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