cumbungi


Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to cumbungi: Typha latifolia

cumbungi

(kʌmˈbʌŋɡɪ)
n
(Plants) any of various tall Australian marsh plants of the genus Typha
[from a native Australian language]
References in periodicals archive ?
The edges of the ponds are dominated by Common Reed Phragmites australis, Cumbungi Typha domingensis and Tall Sedge Carex appressa.
In southeastern and southwestern Australia, Cumbungi or Bulrush, Typha species, was a common Aboriginal food and fibre source (Gott 1982, 1983, 1999).
1999 Cumbungi, Typha Species: A Staple Aboriginal Food in Southern Australia, Australian Aboriginal Studies 1, 33-50.
In southeastern and southwestern Australia, Cumbungi or Bulrush, Typha species, is often mentioned as an Aboriginal food and fibre source.
Cumbungi are often found growing in dense local patches, which extend their area by growth and branching of the rhizomes; they can rapidly fill in an irrigation channel and are regarded as a pest (Mitchell 1978, 65).
The common name `rush' has been given to various members of the sedges, grasses, rushes, cord-rushes and lilies, as well as Cumbungi; consequently, it is sometimes difficult to be sure that a record applies to Cumbungi and not to other aquatic species.
At the present time, any of the following may be used: Narrow-leaf and Broad-leaf Cumbungi, Bulrush, Reed-mace (Hartley 1979, 97); Narrow-leaved Cumbungi, Narrow-leaved Bulrush; Broad-leaved Cumbungi, Broad-leaved Bulrush (Briggs 1987, 8).
The two major uses of Cumbungi were for food and fibre.
Mounds still remaining on the flood-plain are full of these baked clay balls (Coutts et al 1979, 60, 69; Frankel 1991, 74-82) and were certainly cooking sites for Cumbungi and other foods.
Thus GUMBUNG, `rush root' in Stone, has become Cumbungi, the English common name for the whole plant; and WANGULL, `rush root, old, water gone', is the wangle, wonga and wongal of other recorders.
Although there are reports from the Darling River near its junction with the Murray, it is not clear just how far up the Darling the use of Cumbungi extended.
Due to the distinctive structure of the pollen grains, pollen cores can identify the presence of Cumbungi as a resource in archaeological areas, but the practice of gathering the immature flowering shoots for food might well have reduced the amount of pollen produced.