cunner

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cun·ner

 (kŭn′ər)
n.
A small brownish wrasse (Tautogolabrus adspersus) of northern North American Atlantic waters.

[Perhaps alteration of conner, one who cons (guides a ship); see con3.]

cunner

(ˈkʌnə)
n
1. (Fishing) a fish (Crenilabrus melops) of the wrasse family found in British coastal areas. Also called: gilt-head
2. (Fishing) a salt-water fish (Tautogolabrus adspersus) found in western Atlantic areas. Also called: bergali or conner

cun•ner

(ˈkʌn ər)

n.
a small Atlantic wrasse, Tautogolabrus adspersus.
[1595–1605; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cunner - common in north Atlantic coastal waters of the United Statescunner - common in north Atlantic coastal waters of the United States
wrasse - chiefly tropical marine fishes with fleshy lips and powerful teeth; usually brightly colored
genus Tautogolabrus, Tautogolabrus - a genus of Labridae
References in periodicals archive ?
Predation upon postlarval lobsters Homarus americanus by cunners Tautogolabrus adspersus and mud crabs Neopanope sayi on three different substrates: eelgrass, mud and rocks.
Paradoxical effect of cadmium exposure on antibody responses in two fish species: inhibition in cunners (Tautoglabrus adspersus) and enhancement in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).
Cunners are not popular with many New York anglers because of the small size and tendency to steal bait.
Paradoxical effects of cadmium on antibacterial antibody responses in two fish species: inhibition in cunners (Tautogolabrus adspersus) and enhancement in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).
Examples of the effects of sublethal doses of single pollutants on immune-system suppression include the effect of cadmium exposure on antibody response in the cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus (Robohm 1986) and on cellular response in rainbow trout (Thuvander & Carlstein 1991) as well as the effects of copper in increasing susceptibility of salmonids to IHN virus (Hetrick et al.
Differential spawning success among territorial male cunners, Tautogolabrus adspersus (Labridae).
Adult and sexually mature male and female cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) were exposed to 17[beta]-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, or estrone, three steroidal estrogens that elicit the vitellogenic response.
In this article, we report on the correlation between measures of reproductive output in laboratory studies with adult cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) and the widely used indicator of estrogen exposure, male plasma vitellogenin expression.
In this article, we report on the correlation between measures of reproductive output in laboratory-exposed adult cunner of both sexes and male plasma vitellogenin expression.
In laboratory studies, we gathered data on egg production, egg viability, egg fertility, sperm motility (presence or absence), male GSI, and male plasma vitellogenin concentrations in cunner over a series of exposure experiments to 17[beta]-estradiol, 17[alpha]-ethynylestradiol, and estrone.
Cunner were collected from Narragansett Bay off the Jamestown pier at the southern tip of Jamestown, Rhode Island (USA), during the summers of 1999 and 2000.
To investigate the correlation between male plasma vitellogenin concentrations and male GSI, data from the 103 surviving male cunner were analyzed.