curate


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cu·rate 1

 (kyo͝or′ĭt)
n.
1. A cleric, especially one who has charge of a parish.
2. A cleric who assists a rector or vicar.

[Middle English curat, from Medieval Latin cūrātus, from Late Latin cūra, spiritual charge, from Latin, care; see cure.]

cu·rate 2

 (kyo͝or′āt′)
tr.v.
1. To organize and oversee (an art exhibit or film festival, for example).
2. To gather and present to the public: a blog that curates news stories.

[Back-formation from curator.]

cu·ra′tion (kyo͝or-ā′shən) n.

curate

(ˈkjʊərɪt)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a clergyman appointed to assist a parish priest
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a clergyman who has the charge of a parish (curate-in-charge)
3. Irish an assistant barman
[C14: from Medieval Latin cūrātus, from cūra spiritual oversight, cure]

curate

(kjʊəˈreɪt)
vb
1. (Art Terms) (tr) to be in charge of selecting, arranging, and presenting material (for an art exhibition or museum)
2. (tr) to be in charge of organizing, arranging, and presenting a festival or other event: The festival was curated by the films' directors..
[C20: back formation from curator]
cuˈration n

cu•rate

(ˈkyʊər ɪt)

n.
1. a cleric assisting a rector or vicar.
2. a cleric in charge of a parish.
[1300–50; Middle English curat (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin cūrātus= Latin cūr(a) care + -ātus -ate1]
cu′rate•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curate - a person authorized to conduct religious worshipcurate - a person authorized to conduct religious worship; "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant churches"
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
ministrant - someone who serves as a minister
Translations
كاهِن مُعاوِن
vikář
hjælpepræstkapellan
Hilfspfarrerkuratieren
segédlelkész
aîstoîarprestur
pastoriaus padėjėjasvikaras
mācītāja palīgs

curate

[ˈkjʊərɪt] N (= parish priest) → cura m; (= assistant) → coadjutor m
to be like the curate's egg it's like the curate's egg (Brit) → tiene su lado bueno y su lado malo

curate

[ˈkjʊərɪt] nvicaire m

curate

n (Catholic) → Kurat m; (Protestant) → Vikar(in) m(f); it’s like the curate’s egges ist streckenweise gar nicht so schlecht

curate

[ˈkjʊərɪt] ncurato, cappellano

curate

(ˈkjuərət) noun
a clergyman in the Church of England assisting a rector or vicar.
References in classic literature ?
At last, our curate (we had a curate then who made the living answer by teaching the little Lintons and Earnshaws, and farming his bit of land himself) advised that the young man should be sent to college; and Mr.
Here, in Number Two, are my cases that I plead: Family of an officer who fell at Waterloo; Wife of a poor curate stricken down by nervous debility; Widow of a grazier in difficulties gored to death by a mad bull; et cetera, et cetera.
I remember Harry saying once that every man who turned himself into an amateur curate for the moment always began by saying that, and then proceeded to break his word.
Many an argument did he have with the curate of his village (a learned man, and a graduate of Siguenza) as to which had been the better knight, Palmerin of England or Amadis of Gaul.
I do not clearly remember the arrival of the curate, so that probably I dozed.
With the curate of Montdidier and the superior of the Jesuits of Amiens.
Gondy dressed himself as an officer, put on a felt cap with a red feather, hung on a long sword, buckled spurs to his boots, wrapped himself in an ample cloak and followed the curate.
It did not appear to me that--in short, you know, Dr Shirley must have a curate, and you had secured his promise.
Carey had finished her business with the banker, she generally went upstairs to have a little chat with his sister; and while the ladies talked of parish matters, the curate or the new bonnet of Mrs.
Casaubon's curate to be; doubtless an excellent man who would go to heaven (for Celia wished not to be unprincipled), but the corners of his mouth were so unpleasant.
It was truly refreshing to hear such a sermon, after being so long accustomed to the dry, prosy discourses of the former curate, and the still less edifying harangues of the rector.
When the two reached home and entered the salon on the ground-floor, they found a large fire lighted, and Madame Saillard, Elisabeth, Monsieur Gaudron and the curate of Saint-Paul's sitting by it.