curdle

(redirected from curdles)
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cur·dle

 (kûr′dl)
v. cur·dled, cur·dling, cur·dles
v.intr.
1.
a. To change into curd.
b. To become congealed or lumpy: The sauce curdled in the pan.
2. To become spoiled or transformed into something bad: Warm feelings curdled into distrust.
v.tr.
1. To cause to curdle, congeal, or become lumpy: "The inlet was curdled with slush" (Alyson Carol Hagy).
2. To cause to be spoiled or transformed into something bad: "an event that curdled whatever goodwill the prince had awakened" (Julia Whitty).

[Frequentative of curd.]

curdle

(ˈkɜːdəl)
vb
1. to turn or cause to turn into curd
2. curdle someone's blood to fill someone with fear
[C16 (crudled, past participle): from curd]
ˈcurdler n

cur•dle

(ˈkɜr dl)

v.t., v.i. -dled, -dling.
1. to change into curd; coagulate.
2. to spoil; turn sour or bad.
Idioms:
curdle one's blood, to fill one with horror or fear.
[1580–90; curd + -le]
cur′dler, n.

curdle


Past participle: curdled
Gerund: curdling

Imperative
curdle
curdle
Present
I curdle
you curdle
he/she/it curdles
we curdle
you curdle
they curdle
Preterite
I curdled
you curdled
he/she/it curdled
we curdled
you curdled
they curdled
Present Continuous
I am curdling
you are curdling
he/she/it is curdling
we are curdling
you are curdling
they are curdling
Present Perfect
I have curdled
you have curdled
he/she/it has curdled
we have curdled
you have curdled
they have curdled
Past Continuous
I was curdling
you were curdling
he/she/it was curdling
we were curdling
you were curdling
they were curdling
Past Perfect
I had curdled
you had curdled
he/she/it had curdled
we had curdled
you had curdled
they had curdled
Future
I will curdle
you will curdle
he/she/it will curdle
we will curdle
you will curdle
they will curdle
Future Perfect
I will have curdled
you will have curdled
he/she/it will have curdled
we will have curdled
you will have curdled
they will have curdled
Future Continuous
I will be curdling
you will be curdling
he/she/it will be curdling
we will be curdling
you will be curdling
they will be curdling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been curdling
you have been curdling
he/she/it has been curdling
we have been curdling
you have been curdling
they have been curdling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been curdling
you will have been curdling
he/she/it will have been curdling
we will have been curdling
you will have been curdling
they will have been curdling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been curdling
you had been curdling
he/she/it had been curdling
we had been curdling
you had been curdling
they had been curdling
Conditional
I would curdle
you would curdle
he/she/it would curdle
we would curdle
you would curdle
they would curdle
Past Conditional
I would have curdled
you would have curdled
he/she/it would have curdled
we would have curdled
you would have curdled
they would have curdled

curdle

To cause a sauce or fresh milk to separate into liquid and solids by overheating.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.curdle - turn into curds; "curdled milk"
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
homogenise, homogenize - become homogeneous or similar, as by mixing; "The two liquids homogenized in the blender"
homogenise, homogenize - break up the fat globules of; "homogenized milk"
homogenise, homogenize - break up the fat globules of; "homogenized milk"
2.curdle - go bad or sour; "The milk curdled"
go bad, spoil - become unfit for consumption or use; "the meat must be eaten before it spoils"
3.curdle - turn from a liquid to a solid mass; "his blood curdled"
clot, coagulate - change from a liquid to a thickened or solid state; "coagulated blood"

curdle

verb congeal, clot, thicken, condense, turn sour, solidify, coagulate The sauce must not boil or the egg yolk will curdle.
melt, dissolve, soften, thaw, liquefy, deliquesce

curdle

verb
To change or be changed from a liquid into a soft, semisolid, or solid mass:
Translations
يروِّب، يتَخَثَّر
srazit
koagulereskille
hyydyttäähyytyäjuoksettaajuoksettuasaostaa
hlaupa, ysta
sukrekėtisurūgti
sakupt

curdle

[ˈkɜːdl]
A. VT (= form curds in) → cuajar; (= separate) [+ milk, sauce] → cortar
it was enough to curdle the bloodfue para helar la sangre a uno
B. VI (= form curds) → cuajarse; (= separate) [milk, sauce] → cortarse

curdle

[ˈkɜːrdəl]
vi
[milk] → cailler, se cailler; [sauce, mixture] → tourner; [mayonnaise] → tomber
it made his blood curdle → cela lui a glacé le sang
vt [+ milk] → cailler; [+ sauce, mixture] → faire tourner; [mayonnaise] → faire tomber

curdle

vt (lit, fig)gerinnen lassen; to curdle somebody’s bloodjdm das Blut in den Adern gerinnen lassen
vigerinnen; his blood curdleddas Blut gerann ihm in den Adern

curdle

[ˈkɜːdl]
1. vt (gen) → far cagliare; (mayonnaise) → far impazzire
2. vi (see vt) → cagliarsi, cagliare, impazzire
it made my blood curdle → mi ha gelato il sangue nelle vene

curdle

(ˈkəːdl) verb
to turn into curd. The heat has curdled the milk; This milk has curdled.

curdle

v. cuajarse, coagularse, engrumecerse.
References in classic literature ?
As the juice of the fig-tree curdles milk, and thickens it in a moment though it is liquid, even so instantly did Paeeon cure fierce Mars.
You have read this strange and terrific story, Margaret; and do you not feel your blood congeal with horror, like that which even now curdles mine?
The music she selected to play was of the most scandalously profane sort, associated with performances on the stage which it curdles one's blood to think of.
And at the same instant Dantes felt himself flung into the air like a wounded bird, falling, falling, with a rapidity that made his blood curdle.
Suddenly the voice of young Edwards was heard shouting in those appalling tones that carry alarm to the very soul, and which curdle the blood of those that hear them.
Miss Snevellicci's modest double-knock was answered by a foot-boy, who, in reply to her inquiry whether Mrs Curdle was at home, opened his eyes very wide, grinned very much, and said he didn't know, but he'd inquire.
Now, Mrs Curdle was supposed, by those who were best informed on such points, to possess quite the London taste in matters relating to literature and the drama; and as to Mr Curdle, he had written a pamphlet of sixty-four pages, post octavo, on the character of the Nurse's deceased husband in Romeo and Juliet, with an inquiry whether he really had been a 'merry man' in his lifetime, or whether it was merely his widow's affectionate partiality that induced her so to report him.
Well, Miss Snevellicci,' said Mrs Curdle, entering the parlour,
Miss Snevellicci made a graceful obeisance, and hoped Mrs Curdle was well, as also Mr Curdle, who at the same time appeared.
Slurk, pacing to and fro, 'to curdle the ink in one's pen, and induce one to abandon their cause for ever.