cure


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cure

 (kyo͝or)
n.
1.
a. A drug or course of medical treatment used to restore health: discovered a new cure for ulcers.
b. Restoration of health; recovery from disease: the likelihood of cure.
c. Something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing situation: The cats proved to be a good cure for our mouse problem.
2. Ecclesiastical Spiritual charge or care, as of a priest for a congregation.
3. The office or duties of a curate.
4. The act or process of preserving a product.
v. cured, cur·ing, cures
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be free of a disease or unhealthy condition: medicine that cured the patient of gout.
b. To cause to be free of, to lose interest in, or to stop doing something: a remark that cured me of the illusion that I might be a good singer; a bad reaction that cured him of the desire to smoke cigars; a visit to the dentist that cured her of eating sweets.
2. To eliminate (a disease, for example) from the body by medical or other treatment; cause recovery from: new antibiotics to cure infections.
3. To remove or remedy (something harmful or disturbing): cure a social evil.
4. To preserve (meat, for example), as by salting, smoking, or aging.
5. To prepare, preserve, or finish (a substance) by a chemical or physical process.
6. To vulcanize (rubber).
v.intr.
1. To effect a cure or recovery: a drug that cures without side effects.
2. To be prepared, preserved, or finished by a chemical or physical process: hams curing in the smokehouse.

[Middle English, from Old French, medical treatment, from Latin cūra, from Archaic Latin coisa-.]

cure′less adj.
cur′er n.

cu·ré

 (kyo͝o-rā′, kyo͝or′ā′)
n.
A parish priest, especially in a French-speaking community.

[French, from Old French, from Medieval Latin cūrātus; see curate1.]

cure

(kjʊə)
vb
1. (tr) to get rid of (an ailment, fault, or problem); heal
2. (tr) to restore to health or good condition
3. (intr) to bring about a cure
4. (Cookery) (tr) to preserve (meat, fish, etc) by salting, smoking, etc
5. (Chemical Engineering) (tr)
a. to treat or finish (a substance) by chemical or physical means
b. to vulcanize (rubber)
c. to allow (a polymer) to set often using heat or pressure
6. (Building) (tr) to assist the hardening of (concrete, mortar, etc) by keeping it moist
n
7. (Medicine) a return to health, esp after specific treatment
8. (Medicine) any course of medical therapy, esp one proved effective in combating a disease
9. a means of restoring health or improving a condition, situation, etc
10. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the spiritual and pastoral charge of a parish: the cure of souls.
11. (Cookery) a process or method of preserving meat, fish, etc, by salting, pickling, or smoking
[(n) C13: from Old French, from Latin cūra care; in ecclesiastical sense, from Medieval Latin cūra spiritual charge; (vb) C14: from Old French curer, from Latin cūrāre to attend to, heal, from cūra care]
ˈcureless adj
ˈcurer n

curé

(ˈkjʊəreɪ)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a parish priest in France
[French, from Medieval Latin cūrātus; see curate1]

cure

(kyʊər)

n., v. cured, cur•ing. n.
1. a means of healing or restoring to health; remedy.
2. a method or course of remedial treatment, as for disease.
3. successful remedial treatment; restoration to health.
4. a means of correcting or relieving anything troublesome or detrimental: a cure for inflation.
5. a process of preserving meat, fish, etc., by smoking, salting, or the like.
6. spiritual or religious charge of the people in a certain district.
7. the office or district of a curate.
v.t.
8. to restore to health.
9. to relieve or rid of (an illness, bad habit, etc.).
10. to prepare (meat, fish, etc.) for preservation by smoking, salting, etc.
11. to process (rubber, tobacco, etc.) as by fermentation or aging.
12. to promote hardening of (fresh concrete or mortar), as by keeping damp.
v.i.
13. to effect a cure.
14. to become cured.
[1250–1300; (v.) < Middle French curer < Latin cūrāre to take care of, derivative of cūra care; (n.) < Old French cure < Latin cūra]
cure′less, adj.
cur′er, n.

cu•ré

(kyʊˈreɪ, ˈkyʊər eɪ)

n., pl. -rés.
(in France) a parish priest.
[1645–55; < French, Old French; modeled on Medieval Latin cūrātus parish priest; see curate]

cure


Past participle: cured
Gerund: curing

Imperative
cure
cure
Present
I cure
you cure
he/she/it cures
we cure
you cure
they cure
Preterite
I cured
you cured
he/she/it cured
we cured
you cured
they cured
Present Continuous
I am curing
you are curing
he/she/it is curing
we are curing
you are curing
they are curing
Present Perfect
I have cured
you have cured
he/she/it has cured
we have cured
you have cured
they have cured
Past Continuous
I was curing
you were curing
he/she/it was curing
we were curing
you were curing
they were curing
Past Perfect
I had cured
you had cured
he/she/it had cured
we had cured
you had cured
they had cured
Future
I will cure
you will cure
he/she/it will cure
we will cure
you will cure
they will cure
Future Perfect
I will have cured
you will have cured
he/she/it will have cured
we will have cured
you will have cured
they will have cured
Future Continuous
I will be curing
you will be curing
he/she/it will be curing
we will be curing
you will be curing
they will be curing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been curing
you have been curing
he/she/it has been curing
we have been curing
you have been curing
they have been curing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been curing
you will have been curing
he/she/it will have been curing
we will have been curing
you will have been curing
they will have been curing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been curing
you had been curing
he/she/it had been curing
we had been curing
you had been curing
they had been curing
Conditional
I would cure
you would cure
he/she/it would cure
we would cure
you would cure
they would cure
Past Conditional
I would have cured
you would have cured
he/she/it would have cured
we would have cured
you would have cured
they would have cured

cure

To preserve meat or fish by salting, drying or smoking.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cure - a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve paincure - a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain
treatment, intervention - care provided to improve a situation (especially medical procedures or applications that are intended to relieve illness or injury)
acoustic - a remedy for hearing loss or deafness
antidote, counterpoison - a remedy that stops or controls the effects of a poison
emetic, nauseant, vomitive, vomit - a medicine that induces nausea and vomiting
lenitive - remedy that eases pain and discomfort
lotion, application - liquid preparation having a soothing or antiseptic or medicinal action when applied to the skin; "a lotion for dry skin"
magic bullet - a remedy (drug or therapy or preventive) that cures or prevents a disease; "there is no magic bullet against cancer"
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
ointment, salve, unguent, balm, unction - semisolid preparation (usually containing a medicine) applied externally as a remedy or for soothing an irritation
alleviant, palliative, alleviator - remedy that alleviates pain without curing
catholicon, cure-all, nostrum, panacea - hypothetical remedy for all ills or diseases; once sought by the alchemists
preventative, preventive, prophylactic - remedy that prevents or slows the course of an illness or disease; "the doctor recommended several preventatives"
Verb1.cure - provide a cure for, make healthy again; "The treatment cured the boy's acne"; "The quack pretended to heal patients but never managed to"
practice of medicine, medicine - the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries; "he studied medicine at Harvard"
aid, help - improve the condition of; "These pills will help the patient"
recuperate - restore to good health or strength
2.cure - prepare by drying, salting, or chemical processing in order to preserve; "cure meats"; "cure pickles"; "cure hay"
preserve, keep - prevent (food) from rotting; "preserved meats"; "keep potatoes fresh"
cure - be or become preserved; "the apricots cure in the sun"
dun - cure by salting; "dun codfish"
3.cure - make (substances) hard and improve their usability; "cure resin"; "cure cement"; "cure soap"
harden, indurate - become hard or harder; "The wax hardened"
4.cure - be or become preserved; "the apricots cure in the sun"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
cure - prepare by drying, salting, or chemical processing in order to preserve; "cure meats"; "cure pickles"; "cure hay"

cure

verb
1. make better, correct, heal, relieve, remedy, mend, rehabilitate, help, ease An operation finally cured his shin injury.
2. restore to health, restore, heal I was cured almost overnight.
3. rectify, improve, fix, remedy, right, correct, repair, amend, make good, mend, redress, put right, emend We need to cure our environmental problems.
4. preserve, smoke, dry, salt, pickle, kipper Legs of pork were cured and smoked over the fire.
noun
1. remedy, treatment, medicine, healing, antidote, corrective, panacea, restorative, nostrum There is still no cure for the common cold.
Quotations
"It is part of the cure to wish to be cured" [Seneca Phaedra]
"The cure is worse than the disease" [Philip Massinger The Bondman]

cure

noun
1. An agent used to restore health:
2. Something that corrects or counteracts:
verb
To rectify (an undesirable or unhealthy condition):
Translations
شِفَاءشِفاء، عِلاج، دَواءيثَخلَّص، يُخلِّصيَشْفي، يُخلِّصيُعالِجُ
léčitlékvyléčitkonzervovat
kurhelbredekonserverekureremiddel
parantaahoitaahoitoparannusparannuskeino
izliječitilijek
kigyógyítpácol
læknalækning, meîferîverka
治療治す
치료(...을)치료하다
remediumsanare
gydomasisišgydomasišgydymasišgydytisūdyti
ārstēšanaārstētārstniecisks līdzeklisdziedināšanaizārstēt
zdravilozdraviti
botabotemedelkur
การรักษารักษา
chữa bệnhsự chữa bệnh

cure

[kjʊəʳ]
A. N (= remedy) → remedio m; (= course of treatment) → cura f; (= process of recovery) → curación f
there is no known cureno existe curación
to be beyond cure [person] → padecer una enfermedad incurable; [situation, injustice] → ser irremediable
to take a cure (for illness) → tomar un remedio
B. VT
1. (Med) [+ disease, patient] → curar (fig) [+ poverty, injustice, evil] → remediar
to cure sb of a habitquitar a algn un vicio
what can't be cured must be enduredhay cosas que no queda más remedio que aguantar
2. (= preserve) (in salt) → salar; (by smoking) → curar; (by drying) → secar; [+ animal hide] → curtir

cure

[ˈkjʊər]
vt
[+ illness] → guérir; [+ problem, habit] → guérir; [+ person] → guérir
to cure sb of sth → guérir qn de qch
to be cured of sth [+ illness] → être guéri(e) de qch
(COOKERY) [+ food] (by salting)saler; (by smoking)fumer; (by drying)sécher
[+ leather, hide] → traiter
n
(for illness)remède m
a hangover cure, a cure for hangovers → un remède contre la gueule de bois
(for problem)solution f miracle curecure-all [ˈkjʊərɔːl] n
(lit) (for illnesses)panacée f
(fig) (for problems)panacée f

cure

vt
(Med) illness, personheilen, kurieren (inf); to be/get cured (of something)(von etw) geheilt or kuriert (inf)sein/werden; he used to be an alcoholic but he’s been cureder war früher Alkoholiker, aber jetzt ist er geheilt or kuriert (inf)
(fig) inflation, ill etcabhelfen (+dat); to cure somebody of somethingjdm etw austreiben, jdn von etw kurieren; I’ll cure him!dem werde ich das schon austreiben!
foodhaltbar machen; (= salt)pökeln; (= smoke)räuchern; (= dry)trocknen; skins, tobaccotrocknen
vi
(= be healed)heilen
(food, bacon, fish) it is left to cure (= to salt)es wird zum Pökeln eingelegt; (= to smoke)es wird zum Räuchern aufgehängt; (= to dry)es wird zum Trocknen aufgehängt or ausgebreitet
n
(Med) (= remedy)(Heil)mittel nt(for gegen); (= treatment)Heilverfahren nt(for sb für jdn, for sth gegen etw); (= recovery)Heilung f; (= health cure)Kur f; (fig: = remedy) → Mittel nt(for gegen); to take the curezur or in Kur gehen, eine Kur machen; beyond cure (patient)unheilbar krank; illnessunheilbar; (fig) state of affairs, laziness etchoffnungslos; there’s no cure for that (lit)das ist unheilbar; (fig)dagegen kann man nichts machen
(Eccl: = spiritual care) the cure of soulsdie Seelsorge

cure

[kjʊəʳ]
1. n (remedy) → cura; (recovery) → guarigione f
to take a cure → fare una cura
2. vt
a. (Med) (disease, patient) → guarire (fig) (poverty, injustice, evil) → eliminare
to be cured of sth → essere guarito/a da qc
to cure sb of a habit → far perdere a qn un'abitudine
b. (preserve, in salt) → salare; (by smoking) → affumicare; (by drying) → seccare, essiccare; (animal hide) → conciare, trattare

cure

(kjuə) verb
1. to make better. That medicine cured me; That will cure him of his bad habits.
2. to get rid of (an illness etc). That pill cured my headache.
3. to preserve (bacon etc) by drying, salting etc.
noun
something which cures. They're trying to find a cure for cancer.
ˈcurable adjective
able to be cured. a curable form of cancer.
curative (ˈkjuərətiv) adjective
intended to, or likely to, cure. curative treatment.

cure

شِفَاء, يُعالِجُ léčit, lék helbrede, kur heilen, Heilung θεραπεία, θεραπεύω cura, curar parannuskeino, parantaa guérir, traitement izliječiti, lijek cura, curare 治す, 治療 치료, (...을)치료하다 geneesmiddel, genezen kur, kurere kuracja, zaradzić cura, curar лечение, лечить bota, botemedel การรักษา, รักษา tedavi, tedavi etmek chữa bệnh, sự chữa bệnh 治愈

cure

n. curación, remedio;
v. curar, sanar, remediar.

cure

n cura, remedio; vt curar
References in classic literature ?
I try to cure it, I think I have, and then it breaks out worse than ever.
He wanted to cure himself of the habit of drink, and thought that by escaping from his city associates and living in a rural community he would have a better chance in the struggle with the appetite that was destroying him.
My wife she make a poultice of leaves--they cure me," said the Indian.
If shame could cure me of my drowsiness, I should never close an eye again," said the uneasy youth, gazing at the ingenuous countenance of Alice, where, however, in its sweet solicitude, he read nothing to confirm his half-awakened suspicion.
He expressed great alarm at his pastor's state of health, but was anxious to attempt the cure, and, if early undertaken, seemed not despondent of a favourable result.
His clear, listening face, framed in its smooth whiteness, made him for the minute as appealing as some wistful patient in a children's hospital; and I would have given, as the resemblance came to me, all I possessed on earth really to be the nurse or the sister of charity who might have helped to cure him.
One complained of a bad cold in his head, upon which Jonah mixed him a pitch-like potion of gin and molasses, which he swore was a sovereign cure for all colds and catarrhs whatsoever, never mind of how long standing, or whether caught off the coast of Labrador, or on the weather side of an ice-island.
How to cure such a dyspepsia it were hard to say, unless by administering three or four boat loads of Brandreth's pills, and then running out of harm's way, as laborers do in blasting rocks.
This was a little joke of John's; he used to say that a regular course of "the Birtwick horseballs" would cure almost any vicious horse; these balls, he said, were made up of patience and gentleness, firmness and petting, one pound of each to be mixed up with half a pint of common sense, and given to the horse every day.
Here was a remedy for the smoking habit, twenty-five doses for a quarter, and a cure absolutely guaranteed in ten doses.
Ministers can't help the evil, perhaps,--can't cure it, any more than we can,--but defend it
I wonder that about this time, or say between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, too late for the morning papers and too early for the evening ones, there is not a general explosion heard up and down the street, scattering a legion of antiquated and house-bred notions and whims to the four winds for an airing-and so the evil cure itself.