cured


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cure

 (kyo͝or)
n.
1.
a. A drug or course of medical treatment used to restore health: discovered a new cure for ulcers.
b. Restoration of health; recovery from disease: the likelihood of cure.
c. Something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing situation: The cats proved to be a good cure for our mouse problem.
2. Ecclesiastical Spiritual charge or care, as of a priest for a congregation.
3. The office or duties of a curate.
4. The act or process of preserving a product.
v. cured, cur·ing, cures
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be free of a disease or unhealthy condition: medicine that cured the patient of gout.
b. To cause to be free of, to lose interest in, or to stop doing something: a remark that cured me of the illusion that I might be a good singer; a bad reaction that cured him of the desire to smoke cigars; a visit to the dentist that cured her of eating sweets.
2. To eliminate (a disease, for example) from the body by medical or other treatment; cause recovery from: new antibiotics to cure infections.
3. To remove or remedy (something harmful or disturbing): cure a social evil.
4. To preserve (meat, for example), as by salting, smoking, or aging.
5. To prepare, preserve, or finish (a substance) by a chemical or physical process.
6. To vulcanize (rubber).
v.intr.
1. To effect a cure or recovery: a drug that cures without side effects.
2. To be prepared, preserved, or finished by a chemical or physical process: hams curing in the smokehouse.

[Middle English, from Old French, medical treatment, from Latin cūra, from Archaic Latin coisa-.]

cure′less adj.
cur′er n.

cu·ré

 (kyo͝o-rā′, kyo͝or′ā′)
n.
A parish priest, especially in a French-speaking community.

[French, from Old French, from Medieval Latin cūrātus; see curate1.]

cured

(kjʊəd)
adj
(Cookery) (of food) treated by salting, smoking, or drying in order to preserve it
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cured - freed from illness or injury; "the patient appears cured"; "the incision is healed"; "appears to be entirely recovered"; "when the recovered patient tries to remember what occurred during his delirium"- Normon Cameron
well - in good health especially after having suffered illness or injury; "appears to be entirely well"; "the wound is nearly well"; "a well man"; "I think I'm well; at least I feel well"
2.cured - (used of rubber) treated by a chemical or physical process to improve its properties (hardness and strength and odor and elasticity)
processed - prepared or converted from a natural state by subjecting to a special process; "processed ores"
3.cured - (used of concrete or mortar) kept moist to assist the hardening
seasoned - aged or processed; "seasoned wood"
4.cured - (used of hay e.g.) allowed to dry
preserved - prevented from decaying or spoiling and prepared for future use
5.cured - (used especially of meat) cured in brine
preserved - prevented from decaying or spoiling and prepared for future use
6.cured - (used of tobacco) aging as a preservative process (`aged' is pronounced as one syllable)cured - (used of tobacco) aging as a preservative process (`aged' is pronounced as one syllable)
preserved - prevented from decaying or spoiling and prepared for future use
References in classic literature ?
The you must return to your palace, bathe, and go to sleep, and when you awake to-morrow morning you will be cured.
People began to come to him from a distance, and began bringing invalids to him whom they declared he cured.
If ever a man cured sea-sickness in a new way yet, I am that man--I got over it, Mr.
In other places people operated on a patient's mind, without saying a word to him, and cured him.
I on the contrary affirm that I am still blind; for when I lost the use of my eyes, I saw in my house various chattels and valuable goods: but now, though he swears I am cured of my blindness, I am not able to see a single thing in it.
It is a head like yours," he said, "but it is poorly cured.
Well, I said, and to require the help of medicine, not when a wound has to be cured, or on occasion of an epidemic, but just because, by indolence and a habit of life such as we have been describing, men fill themselves with waters and winds, as if their bodies were a marsh, compelling the ingenious sons of Asclepius to find more names for diseases, such as flatulence and catarrh; is not this, too, a disgrace?
But in what way this trouble of poverty and ignorance is to be cured by schools is as incomprehensible as how the hen-roost affects the screaming.
For in those plains and deserts where they engaged in combat and came out wounded, it was not always that there was some one to cure them, unless indeed they had for a friend some sage magician to succour them at once by fetching through the air upon a cloud some damsel or dwarf with a vial of water of such virtue that by tasting one drop of it they were cured of their hurts and wounds in an instant and left as sound as if they had not received any damage whatever.
I ran away to the country to be cured, but I am not cured.
A malady that was formerly cured by the touch of the
For those that put their bodies to endure in health, may in most sicknesses, which are not very sharp, be cured only with diet, and tendering.