curer


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Related to curer: Currer Bell

cure

 (kyo͝or)
n.
1.
a. A drug or course of medical treatment used to restore health: discovered a new cure for ulcers.
b. Restoration of health; recovery from disease: the likelihood of cure.
c. Something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing situation: The cats proved to be a good cure for our mouse problem.
2. Ecclesiastical Spiritual charge or care, as of a priest for a congregation.
3. The office or duties of a curate.
4. The act or process of preserving a product.
v. cured, cur·ing, cures
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be free of a disease or unhealthy condition: medicine that cured the patient of gout.
b. To cause to be free of, to lose interest in, or to stop doing something: a remark that cured me of the illusion that I might be a good singer; a bad reaction that cured him of the desire to smoke cigars; a visit to the dentist that cured her of eating sweets.
2. To eliminate (a disease, for example) from the body by medical or other treatment; cause recovery from: new antibiotics to cure infections.
3. To remove or remedy (something harmful or disturbing): cure a social evil.
4. To preserve (meat, for example), as by salting, smoking, or aging.
5. To prepare, preserve, or finish (a substance) by a chemical or physical process.
6. To vulcanize (rubber).
v.intr.
1. To effect a cure or recovery: a drug that cures without side effects.
2. To be prepared, preserved, or finished by a chemical or physical process: hams curing in the smokehouse.

[Middle English, from Old French, medical treatment, from Latin cūra, from Archaic Latin coisa-.]

cure′less adj.
cur′er n.

cu·ré

 (kyo͝o-rā′, kyo͝or′ā′)
n.
A parish priest, especially in a French-speaking community.

[French, from Old French, from Medieval Latin cūrātus; see curate1.]
References in classic literature ?
There is not only the herd, but the shearer and brander, and then the dresser, the curer, the dyer, the fuller, the webster, the merchant, and a score of others.
The bodily physician, perhaps, misunderstood the curer of souls; and before they came to an explanation, Mr Blifil came to them with a most melancholy countenance, and acquainted them that he brought sad news, that his mother was dead at Salisbury; that she had been seized on the road home with the gout in her head and stomach, which had carried her off in a few hours.
But there all is false and foul, above all the blood--thanks to old evil diseases and worse curers.
But they feared for their quiet night when it emerged that retired fish curer Campbell was also on the Betsy when she ran aground and was badly holed two years ago.
And if the result doesn't go your team's way, the Bruce is one of the first pubs you will encounter on the way back across the river from Palmerston Park for a post-match curer.
Flavoured bacon is also an area where small independent speciality curer Persoon sees opportunities.
A curer, Yayonya, just reported that an ilymane (spirit) lacerated her qalye (the internal vital organs one of which is liver).
Last year's beating Heineken European Cup finalists have already topped their pool, four victories from five games acting as a powerful curer to what must have been a throbbing hangover.
Maradona flew in to Neuchatel on Tuesday - landing two hours ahead of his flight - for a 10- day curer.
The miraculous Drying Lotion has long been hailed as an expert spot curer - whiteheads and surface pimples are dried up overnight without irritating or drying the surrounding skin (pounds 15 from HQhair.
The agglomeration of Compiegne Region wants to perpetuate the project to maintain in the pipe network (29 km) by regularly monitoring the level of fine points and curer each year a significant number of straight pipe.
You will seriously consider taking the fruit juice, before realising you'll be caned by the lads and forcing a curer down.