curialist

curialist

(ˈkjʊərɪəlɪst)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a member or supporter of the papal curia
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58) Guido certainly makes strong claims about the Church's supreme judicial role, as we would expect from a fourteenth-century curialist working for the pope's cause against the Spiritual Franciscans.
Beyond Szoka, today's most powerful American curialist is Archbishop James Harvey, 52, originally from Milwaukee and now serving as prefect of the papal household.
No curialist goes into a meeting without knowing what he intends to get out of it.
So, he wrote, he would support the draft documents put before them by the curialists.
Drawing on recent studies of the post-Tridentine curial bureaucracy and canonizations, he traces the overlapping jurisdictions' of major curialists during the canonization process, and observes how the 1629 idealization of Andrea fits him to a post-Tridentine model: a male, Italian cleric; member of a religious order; scion of a noble family; good pastot and charitable giver.
Its participants demonstrated, at times genuine creativity and adherence to the main lines of Renaissance humanist thought, and the conviction of popes and curialists in the necessity and importance of anti-Protestant action waxed and waned in an exceptionally human, and truly fascinating, manner.
He made his own manners, whether it was assembling leaders of world religions to pray for peace in Assisi, Italy, against the advice of curialists worried about syncretism, or apologizing to the Orthodox in Athens, Greece, for centuries of Catholic maltreatment, over the objections of ecumenical hawks who felt being pope means never having to say you're sorry.
This piece by D'Amico captures the anxiety and frustration that bedeviled the Roman Curia and the curialists at the outset of the Reformation.
They agreed it would be a difficult conclave, for while the progressives had a large vote in the council, the curialists and conservatives certainly remained strong within the College of Cardinals.
Some curialists would like to see the birth control decision reviewed.
Wilkes' book is an Easter morning collection of ecclesial data, a herald that announces that for all the grim news out of Rome, all the exhausting and navel-gazing pronouncements, all the disciplines and silencings and threats and secret little letters shooting around among curialists and hierarchy the world over, Catholics -- ordinary pew style Catholics -- and a lot of their priests, understand what counts.
It is a refreshing contrast, they say, from the ambiguous diplomatic language in which curialists normally couch their pronouncements.