curialist

curialist

(ˈkjʊərɪəlɪst)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a member or supporter of the papal curia
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58) Guido certainly makes strong claims about the Church's supreme judicial role, as we would expect from a fourteenth-century curialist working for the pope's cause against the Spiritual Franciscans.
Accompanying the latter on diplomatic legations to France and the Empire, Cervini gained the experience that prepared him as papal legate to Trent, diocesan administrator, cardinal and curialist, director of the Roman Inquisition and the Vatican Library, and finally as Pope, albeit for only three weeks.
Beyond Szoka, today's most powerful American curialist is Archbishop James Harvey, 52, originally from Milwaukee and now serving as prefect of the papal household.
No curialist goes into a meeting without knowing what he intends to get out of it.
In Chapter 3, McCahill again turns to humanist texts by papal curialists for insights into humanist views and recommendations for negotiating this tumultuous period.
So, he wrote, he would support the draft documents put before them by the curialists.
Drawing on recent studies of the post-Tridentine curial bureaucracy and canonizations, he traces the overlapping jurisdictions' of major curialists during the canonization process, and observes how the 1629 idealization of Andrea fits him to a post-Tridentine model: a male, Italian cleric; member of a religious order; scion of a noble family; good pastot and charitable giver.
Greeley subjects the pontificate of John Paul II to a devastating critique: That pope stifled the movement for collegiality, treated bishops as low-level bureaucrats, and spent his considerable communications talent on promoting a cult of personality that persuaded few people of the merits of his teachings, while he left the administration of the Vatican to myopic curialists.
Seripando's insistence on the ius divinum brought him into conflict with the curialists at the council, led by fellow legate Cardinal Simonetta, who feared that basing residency on divine law would compromise papal primacy.
Its participants demonstrated, at times genuine creativity and adherence to the main lines of Renaissance humanist thought, and the conviction of popes and curialists in the necessity and importance of anti-Protestant action waxed and waned in an exceptionally human, and truly fascinating, manner.
He made his own manners, whether it was assembling leaders of world religions to pray for peace in Assisi, Italy, against the advice of curialists worried about syncretism, or apologizing to the Orthodox in Athens, Greece, for centuries of Catholic maltreatment, over the objections of ecumenical hawks who felt being pope means never having to say you're sorry.
This piece by D'Amico captures the anxiety and frustration that bedeviled the Roman Curia and the curialists at the outset of the Reformation.