curie


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Related to curie: Curie constant

cu·rie

 (kyo͝or′ē, kyo͝o-rē′)
n. Abbr. Ci
A unit of radioactivity, equal to the amount of radioactive decay of an isotope; equal to 3.7 × 1010 disintegrations per second, or 3.7 × 1010 becquerels. In 1975, the curie was replaced by the becquerel as the standard SI unit of radioactivity.

[After Pierre Curie.]

Curie

(ˈkjʊərɪ; -riː; French kyri)
n
1. (Biography) Marie (mari). 1867–1934, French physicist and chemist, born in Poland: discovered with her husband Pierre the radioactivity of thorium, and discovered and isolated radium and polonium. She shared a Nobel prize for physics (1903) with her husband and Henri Becquerel, and was awarded a Nobel prize for chemistry (1911)
2. (Biography) her husband, Pierre (pjɛr). 1859–1906, French physicist and chemist

curie

(ˈkjʊərɪ; -riː)
n
(Units) a unit of radioactivity that is equal to 3.7 × 1010 disintegrations per second. Symbol: Ci
[C20: named after Pierre Curie]

cu•rie

(ˈkyʊər i, kyʊˈri)

n.
a unit of activity of radioactive substances equivalent to 3.70 x 1010 disintegrations per second. Abbr.: Ci
[1910; after Pierre Curie]

Cu•rie

(ˈkyʊər i, kyʊˈri)

n.
1. Irène, Joliot-Curie.
2. Marie, 1867–1934, Polish physicist and chemist in France: codiscoverer of radium 1898; Nobel prize for physics 1903, for chemistry 1911.
3. her husband, Pierre, 1859–1906, French physicist and chemist: codiscoverer of radium; Nobel prize for physics 1903.

cu·rie

(kyo͝or′ē, kyo͝o-rē′)
A unit used to measure the rate of radioactive decay. Radioactive decay is measured by the rate at which the atoms making up a radioactive substance are transformed into different atoms. One curie is equal to 37 billion (3.7 × 1010) of these transformations per second. Many scientists now measure radioactive decay in becquerels rather than curies.

curie

A unit used to measure the activity of a radioactive substance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curie - a unit of radioactivity equal to the amount of a radioactive isotope that decays at the rate of 37,000,000,000 disintegrations per second
radioactivity unit - a measure of radioactivity
millicurie - a unit of radioactivity equal to one thousandth of a curie
2.Curie - French physicist; husband of Marie Curie (1859-1906)
3.curie - French chemist (born in Poland) who won two Nobel prizesCurie - French chemist (born in Poland) who won two Nobel prizes; one (with her husband and Henri Becquerel) for research on radioactivity and another for her discovery of radium and polonium (1867-1934)
Translations

curie

[ˈkjʊərɪ] Ncurie m

curie

n (Phys) → Curie nt
References in classic literature ?
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