curie

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cu·rie

 (kyo͝or′ē, kyo͝o-rē′)
n. Abbr. Ci
A unit of radioactivity, equal to the amount of radioactive decay of an isotope; equal to 3.7 × 1010 disintegrations per second, or 3.7 × 1010 becquerels. In 1975, the curie was replaced by the becquerel as the standard SI unit of radioactivity.

[After Pierre Curie.]

Curie

(ˈkjʊərɪ; -riː; French kyri)
n
1. (Biography) Marie (mari). 1867–1934, French physicist and chemist, born in Poland: discovered with her husband Pierre the radioactivity of thorium, and discovered and isolated radium and polonium. She shared a Nobel prize for physics (1903) with her husband and Henri Becquerel, and was awarded a Nobel prize for chemistry (1911)
2. (Biography) her husband, Pierre (pjɛr). 1859–1906, French physicist and chemist

curie

(ˈkjʊərɪ; -riː)
n
(Units) a unit of radioactivity that is equal to 3.7 × 1010 disintegrations per second. Symbol: Ci
[C20: named after Pierre Curie]

cu•rie

(ˈkyʊər i, kyʊˈri)

n.
a unit of activity of radioactive substances equivalent to 3.70 x 1010 disintegrations per second. Abbr.: Ci
[1910; after Pierre Curie]

Cu•rie

(ˈkyʊər i, kyʊˈri)

n.
1. Irène, Joliot-Curie.
2. Marie, 1867–1934, Polish physicist and chemist in France: codiscoverer of radium 1898; Nobel prize for physics 1903, for chemistry 1911.
3. her husband, Pierre, 1859–1906, French physicist and chemist: codiscoverer of radium; Nobel prize for physics 1903.

cu·rie

(kyo͝or′ē, kyo͝o-rē′)
A unit used to measure the rate of radioactive decay. Radioactive decay is measured by the rate at which the atoms making up a radioactive substance are transformed into different atoms. One curie is equal to 37 billion (3.7 × 1010) of these transformations per second. Many scientists now measure radioactive decay in becquerels rather than curies.

curie

A unit used to measure the activity of a radioactive substance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curie - a unit of radioactivity equal to the amount of a radioactive isotope that decays at the rate of 37,000,000,000 disintegrations per second
radioactivity unit - a measure of radioactivity
millicurie - a unit of radioactivity equal to one thousandth of a curie
2.Curie - French physicist; husband of Marie Curie (1859-1906)
3.curie - French chemist (born in Poland) who won two Nobel prizesCurie - French chemist (born in Poland) who won two Nobel prizes; one (with her husband and Henri Becquerel) for research on radioactivity and another for her discovery of radium and polonium (1867-1934)
Translations

curie

[ˈkjʊərɪ] Ncurie m

curie

n (Phys) → Curie nt
References in classic literature ?
These labours --the first that were attempted in radiography--served to open the way for Monsieur and Madame Curie to the discovery of radium.
Thus, at the turn of the century, the academically oriented Curies chose not to patent radium and even readily shared information about its preparation and effects.
Publicizing the significant and generous openness of the famous physicist, Meloney stressed both the exceptional intellectual achievements of the two-time Nobel Prize winner and the petites curies, mobile x-ray units that had been deployed at the front lines during World War I, with Curie herself involved in training soldiers how to use them.
By April, the Curies were able to send the Academy a paper (read by Gabriel Lippmann, since they were not members) positing "a much more active element than uranium.
For the next eight years, the Curies worked to solidify their findings.
CAPTION: Estelle Vasey, centre, and Samantha Robson of Northern Rock with nurse Sue Windsor, planting daffodils at the Marie Curies Hospice
Despite the vast wealth it might have brought them, the Curies didn't attempt to patent radium, instead allowing unhindered research access to the scientific community.
He estimated that 6,500 curies of iodine-137 and 1,300 curies of cesium-137 were released.
The Curies began researching radioactive elements after Henri Becquerel discovered, by chance, radioactive uranium.
In July 1898 the Curies detected such an element, which they called polonium after Marie Curie's native land.
The main characters in her life are described: her father, a thwarted scientist whose graft aids her initial advances; her reserved husband Pierre Curie, a genius with whom she shared an intimate passion; and the couple's children who suffer greatly from their mother's depression and the premature loss of their father.
Happy At Last (1980) and other books, portrays Marie Curie (1867-1034) as a blend of brilliance, resolve, passion (for work and at least three men), recurring depression, obsession (this is not the first biography of Curie to include that trait in its title), achievement, and pragmatism.