curing


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to curing: Curing of concrete

cure

 (kyo͝or)
n.
1.
a. A drug or course of medical treatment used to restore health: discovered a new cure for ulcers.
b. Restoration of health; recovery from disease: the likelihood of cure.
c. Something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing situation: The cats proved to be a good cure for our mouse problem.
2. Ecclesiastical Spiritual charge or care, as of a priest for a congregation.
3. The office or duties of a curate.
4. The act or process of preserving a product.
v. cured, cur·ing, cures
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be free of a disease or unhealthy condition: medicine that cured the patient of gout.
b. To cause to be free of, to lose interest in, or to stop doing something: a remark that cured me of the illusion that I might be a good singer; a bad reaction that cured him of the desire to smoke cigars; a visit to the dentist that cured her of eating sweets.
2. To eliminate (a disease, for example) from the body by medical or other treatment; cause recovery from: new antibiotics to cure infections.
3. To remove or remedy (something harmful or disturbing): cure a social evil.
4. To preserve (meat, for example), as by salting, smoking, or aging.
5. To prepare, preserve, or finish (a substance) by a chemical or physical process.
6. To vulcanize (rubber).
v.intr.
1. To effect a cure or recovery: a drug that cures without side effects.
2. To be prepared, preserved, or finished by a chemical or physical process: hams curing in the smokehouse.

[Middle English, from Old French, medical treatment, from Latin cūra, from Archaic Latin coisa-.]

cure′less adj.
cur′er n.

cu·ré

 (kyo͝o-rā′, kyo͝or′ā′)
n.
A parish priest, especially in a French-speaking community.

[French, from Old French, from Medieval Latin cūrātus; see curate1.]

curing

(ˈkjʊərɪŋ)
n
(Cookery) the process of preserving food
healing, curing - Healing is a process in which an organism's health is restored; curing is a method that promotes healing.
See also related terms for healing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curing - the process of becoming hard or solid by cooling or drying or crystallization; "the hardening of concrete"; "he tested the set of the glue"
congealment, congelation - the process of congealing; solidification by (or as if by) freezing
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
plastination - a process involving fixation and dehydration and forced impregnation and hardening of biological tissues; water and lipids are replaced by curable polymers (silicone or epoxy or polyester) that are subsequently hardened; "the plastination of specimens is valuable for research and teaching"
Translations

curing

[ˈkjʊərɪŋ] Ncuración f
see also cure
References in classic literature ?
how we suddenly jump, as Scorpio, or the Scorpion, stings us in rear; we are curing the wound, when whang come the arrows all round; Sagittarius, or the Archer, is amusing himself.
I was complaining of a small fit of the colic, upon which my conductor led me into a room where a great physician resided, who was famous for curing that disease, by contrary operations from the same instrument.
Piperson consulted an almanac, and felt Pigling's ribs; it was too late in the season for curing bacon, and he grudged his meal.
There are two methods of curing the mischiefs of faction: the one, by removing its causes; the other, by controlling its effects.
Later, when he chanced upon a lone, black warrior wearing the counterpart of it, soft and clinging and beautiful from proper curing, it required but an instant to leap from above upon the shoulders of the unsuspecting black, sink a keen blade into his heart and possess the rightly preserved hide.
Your mother will add to them a recipe for a certain balsam, which she had from a Bohemian and which has the miraculous virtue of curing all wounds that do not reach the heart.
I tell you to hope, because I have a method of curing you.
That stint; must have gone too deep for any consolations of philosophy to be available in curing its smart?
He's been curing himself, you know: he's a very learned doctor.
You will repent bitterly hereafter if you do not, for when the harm is done there will be no curing it; consider ere it be too late, and save the Danaans from destruction.
So far from curing, the doctor caught the malady from his patient.
Courtiers have a marvelous instinct in scenting the turn of events; courtiers possess a supreme kind of science; they are diplomatists in throwing light upon the unraveling of complicated intrigues, captains in divining the issue of battles, and physicians in curing the sick.