cutcherry

cutcherry

(ˈkʌtʃərɪ) or

cutchery

n, pl -cherries or -cheries
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (formerly, in India) government offices and law courts collectively
2. (Law) (formerly, in India) government offices and law courts collectively
[C17: from Hindi Kachachrī]
References in periodicals archive ?
Rice and lentils have formed the basis of this one-pot dish since at least 250BC, when the Greek general Seleucus noted Indians' love for the combination, and everyone from the fourteenth-century Moroccan explorer Ibn Battuta to the travelling English doctor John Fryer in 1698 seems to have recorded a variation of Cutcherry, Kedgeree or Kisri.
C Price, the Settlement Officer of Midnapore, described the so-called Chuar Rebellion of 1799 the outcome of the "evil passions of the infuriated Sardars and Paiks," which "carried slaughter and flame to very doors of the Magistrate's cutcherry.
This officer was not to be a distant and awful figure, presiding in his cutcherry [office/court] like a deity in his temple, but a familiar lord, visiting and speaking with them of their quarrels and their crops and looked up to as ma-bap [mother-father] .