cutlass


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cut·lass

also cut·las  (kŭt′ləs)
n.
1. A short heavy sword with a curved single-edged blade, once used as a weapon by sailors.
2. Caribbean A machete.

[French coutelas, from Old French coutelasse, probably augmentative of coutel, knife, from Latin cultellus, diminutive of culter, knife; see skel- in Indo-European roots.]

cutlass

(ˈkʌtləs)
n
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a curved, one-edged sword formerly used by sailors
[C16: from French coutelas, from coutel knife, from Latin cultellus a small knife, from culter knife; see coulter]

cut•lass

or cut•las

(ˈkʌt ləs)

n.
a short, curving sword with a single cutting edge, formerly used by sailors.
[1585–95; earlier coutelace < Middle French coutelas=coutel knife (< Latin cultellus) + -as augmentative suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cutlass - a short heavy curved sword with one edgecutlass - a short heavy curved sword with one edge; formerly used by sailors
sword, steel, blade, brand - a cutting or thrusting weapon that has a long metal blade and a hilt with a hand guard
Translations
سَيْف البَحّاره
šavle
huggert
hukarileukumacheteviidakkoveitsi
rövid kard
bjúgsverî
kardas
mačete
korsan kılıcı

cutlass

[ˈkʌtləs] Nalfanje m

cutlass

[ˈkʌtləs] n (= sword) → coutelas m

cutlass

nEntermesser nt

cutlass

[ˈkʌtləs] n (History) → sciabola

cutlass

(ˈkatləs) noun
a short, broad, slightly curved sword with one cutting edge.
References in classic literature ?
In vain the captain threatened to throw him overboard; suspended a cutlass over his naked wrists; Queequeg was the son of a King, and Queequeg budged not.
So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, lumbering up Shooter's Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass.
The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat, his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.
Many were the compliments and expressions of politeness that passed between Don Quixote and Don Fernando; but they were brought to an end by a traveller who at this moment entered the inn, and who seemed from his attire to be a Christian lately come from the country of the Moors, for he was dressed in a short-skirted coat of blue cloth with half-sleeves and without a collar; his breeches were also of blue cloth, and his cap of the same colour, and he wore yellow buskins and had a Moorish cutlass slung from a baldric across his breast.
I made a step towards it, and it rose up and became a man armed with a cutlass.
But when I added to the gun an English cutlass with which I had shivered his highness's yataghan to pieces, the bey yielded, and agreed to forgive the hand and head, but on condition that the poor fellow never again set foot in Tunis.
Oh, father," continued the executioner, without opening his eyes, as if he feared on opening them to see some frightful object, "it is especially when night comes on and when I have to cross a river, that this terror which I have been unable to conquer comes upon me; it then seems as if my hand grew heavy, as if the cutlass was still in its grasp, as if the water had the color of blood, and all the voices of nature -- the whispering of the trees, the murmur of the wind, the lapping of the wave -- united in a voice tearful, despairing, terrible, crying to me, `Place for the justice of God
These ten men, clothed like manufacturers, have a good cutlass or a good musket at their saddle-bow, and a good pistol in the holster.
with much boyish gratification) buckled on a kind of cutlass under his black cloak.
Up you go; wait a second in the room above, and I'll find you an old cutlass.
They were clad in brilliantly-painted cloths, and the soldiers were armed with the saw-toothed war-club, the bow and arrows barbed and poisoned with the juice of the euphorbium, the cutlass, the "sima," a long sabre (also with saw-like teeth), and some small battle-axes.
Nevertheless, you are not ignorant of the fact that Noel Lescrivain was condemned, a week ago, to pay ten Parisian sous, for having carried a cutlass.