cutler


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cut·ler

 (kŭt′lər)
n.
One who makes, repairs, or sells knives or other cutting instruments.

[Middle English cuteler, from Old French coutelier, from coutel, knife; see cutlass.]

cutler

(ˈkʌtlə)
n
(Crafts) a person who makes or sells cutlery
[C14: from French coutelier, ultimately from Latin culter knife; see cutlass]

cut•ler

(ˈkʌt lər)

n.
a person who makes, sells, or repairs knives and other cutting instruments.
[1350–1400; Middle English cuteler < Anglo-French; Middle French coutelier < Late Latin cultellārius= Latin cultell(us) knife + -ārius -ary; see -er2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cutler - a dealer in cutlerycutler - a dealer in cutlery      
bargainer, dealer, monger, trader - someone who purchases and maintains an inventory of goods to be sold
Translations

cutler

[ˈkʌtləʳ] Ncuchillero m

cutler

cutler

[ˈkʌtləʳ] ncoltellinaio
References in classic literature ?
Cutler died in 1907, but most of the others are still alive and busy.
You did not have to be in the best society to have heard of Captain Cutler, of the siege of Hong-Kong, and the great march across China.
She accepted some flowers from Cutler, which were as tropical and expensive as his victories; and another sort of present from Sir Wilson Seymour, offered later on and more nonchalantly by that gentleman.
The inner door burst open and a big figure appeared, who was more of a contrast to the explanatory Seymour than even Captain Cutler.
Cutler, the British officer, was pachydermatous to ideas, but punctilious about behaviour.
She went across to Captain Cutler and said in her sweetest manner: "I shall value all these flowers, because they must be your favourite flowers.
Cutler had indeed risen stiffly and suddenly, and walked towards the door, hatless, as if at a word of command.
And before he could possibly find that weapon or any other, a brisk running of feet broke upon the pavement outside, and the square face of Cutler was thrust into the same doorway.
Mr Lillyvick,' said Kenwigs, addressing the collector, 'some friends here, sir, are very anxious for the honour of--thank you--Mr and Mrs Cutler, Mr Lillyvick.
These were not mere words of ceremony; for, Mr Cutler, having kept house in Mr Lillyvick's parish, had heard of him very often indeed.
I recollect, sir, there was a girl at Dumdum, a daughter of Cutler of the Artillery, and afterwards married to Lance, the surgeon, who made a dead set at me in the year '4--at me and Mulligatawney, whom I mentioned to you before dinner--a devilish good fellow Mulligatawney--he's a magistrate at Budgebudge, and sure to be in council in five years.
14th, said to me, 'Sedley,' said he, 'I bet you thirteen to ten that Sophy Cutler hooks either you or Mulligatawney before the rains.