cyanide

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cy·a·nide

 (sī′ə-nīd′)
n. also cy·a·nid (-nĭd)
The anionic univalent CN group, or any of various salts or esters of hydrogen cyanide containing a CN group, especially the extremely poisonous compounds potassium cyanide and sodium cyanide.
tr.v. cy·a·nid·ed, cy·a·nid·ing, cy·a·nides
1. To treat (a metal surface) with cyanide to produce a hard surface.
2. To treat (an ore) with cyanide to extract gold or silver.

cyanide

(ˈsaɪəˌnaɪd) or

cyanid

n
1. (Elements & Compounds) any salt of hydrocyanic acid. Cyanides contain the ion CN and are extremely poisonous
2. (Elements & Compounds) another name (not in technical usage) for nitrile
ˌcyaniˈdation n

cy•a•nide

(ˈsaɪ əˌnaɪd, -nɪd)

n., v. -nid•ed, -nid•ing. n.
1. a salt of hydrocyanic acid, as potassium cyanide, KCN.
v.t.
2. to treat with a cyanide, as an ore in order to extract gold.
[1820–30]

cy·a·nide

(sī′ə-nīd′)
Any of a large group of chemical compounds containing the radical CN, especially the very poisonous salts sodium cyanide and potassium cyanide. Cyanides are used to make plastics and to extract and treat metals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cyanide - any of a class of organic compounds containing the cyano radical -CN
organic compound - any compound of carbon and another element or a radical
acrylonitrile, propenonitrile, vinyl cyanide - a colorless liquid unsaturated nitrile made from propene
2.cyanide - an extremely poisonous salt of hydrocyanic acid
sodium cyanide - a white poisonous salt (NaCN) used in electroplating
potassium cyanide - a poisonous salt (KCN) used in electroplating and in photography
salt - a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal (or a radical that acts like a metal)
Translations
سيانيد: مِلح الحِمض الأزرَق
kyanid
cyanid
syanidi
cianid
blásÿrusalt
cianidas
cianīds
kyanid

cyanide

[ˈsaɪənaɪd] Ncianuro m
cyanide of potassiumcianuro m potásico

cyanide

[ˈsaɪənaɪd] ncyanure m

cyanide

nZyanid nt, → Blausäuresalz nt; cyanide poisoningBlausäurevergiftung f

cyanide

[ˈsaɪəˌnaɪd] ncianuro

cyanide

(ˈsaiənaid) noun
a deadly type of poison.

cy·a·nide

n. cianuro, compuesto extremadamente venenoso.

cyanide

n cianuro
References in periodicals archive ?
The results also demonstrate that cyanidation of the gravity concentrates and flotation cleaner scavenger tails is not required in the flow sheet, which was the most favourable recovery method during the 2015 testing.
The re-engineered project utilizes agitated tank leach processing of copper oxide mineralization to produce cathode copper, followed by agitated tank leach cyanidation and carbon-in-leach (CIL) processing for recovery of gold and silver in dore.
Today, however, cyanidation methods, also known as carbon in leach, have been used extensively in gold extraction, and these methods have a detrimental impact on the ecosystem.
At many ASGM in Indonesia, a two-stage process of amalgamation followed by cyanidation is used to ensure maximum recovery of gold from ore [23].
At almost all of the ASGM, the amalgamation process followed by cyanidation process are common methods used to recover as much gold as possible from gold ore [2].
Finally, BOMENCO has estimated that a 200 kg sample from each of the three metallurgical domains should fulfil the requirements of a PEA-level metallurgical testing programme that will include head sample characterisation, grind hardness and sensitivity, determination of gravity and flotation recovery potential, direct cyanidation and/or cyanidation of flotation concentrates before or after oxidation and heap leach recovery potential of the oxide cap material.
The outcome from the programme suggests the resource could be economically treated using standard Gravity Concentration / Carbon in leach (CIL) cyanidation technology.
To maximize the recovery of all precious metals the Company is now working with the metallurgical lab to further develop an encompassing recovery process which will include both cyanidation recovery as well as the silver-lead process.
The company will use conventional gravity and cyanidation processing technology for the production and will mine the particular gold deposit by open pit method, it said.
Meanwhile, local environmental groups are protesting the use of cyanide in the mining procedures that call for crushing, grinding, pressure oxidation, and CIL cyanidation at the Barrick Gold Pueblo Viejo mine.
Some 90 percent of gold mines around the world employ cyanidation to harvest their loot.
Cyanidation as a chemical method for leaching of gold was studied in 1880s by John Steward MacArthur and due to instant good results, it eventually replaced chlorination processing.