cybernetics

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cy·ber·net·ics

 (sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theoretical study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems, especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

[From Greek kubernētēs, governor, from kubernān, to govern.]

cy′ber·net′ic adj.
cy′ber·net′i·cal·ly adv.
cy′ber·net′i·cist, cy′ber·ne·ti′cian (-nĭ-tĭsh′ən) n.

cybernetics

(ˌsaɪbəˈnɛtɪks)
n
(General Engineering) (functioning as singular) the branch of science concerned with control systems in electronic and mechanical devices and the extent to which useful comparisons can be made between man-made and biological systems. See also feedback1
[C20: from Greek kubernētēs steersman, from kubernan to steer, control]
ˌcyberˈnetic, ˌcyberˈnetical adj
ˌcyberˈnetically adv
ˌcyberˈneticist, cybernetician n

cy•ber•net•ics

(ˌsaɪ bərˈnɛt ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the comparative study of organic control and communication systems, as the brain and its neurons, and mechanical or electronic systems analogous to them, as robots or computers.
[1948; < Greek kybernḗt(ēs) helmsman, steersman (kybernē-, variant s. of kybernân to steer + -tēs agent suffix) + -ics]
cy`ber•net′ic, cy`ber•net′i•cal, adj.
cy`ber•net′i•cal•ly, adv.
cy`ber•net′i•cist, cy`ber•ne•ti′cian (-nɪˈtɪʃ ən) n.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
The study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems. Research in cybernetics often involves the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

cybernetics

the comparative study of complex electronic devices and the nervous system in an attempt to understand better the nature of the human brain. — cyberneticist, n.cybernetic, adj.
See also: Automation
the comparative study of complex electronic devices and the nervous system in an attempt to understand better the nature of the human brain. — cyberneticist, n.cybernetic, adj.
See also: Brain
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cybernetics - (biology) the field of science concerned with processes of communication and control (especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems)
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
informatics, information processing, information science, IP - the sciences concerned with gathering, manipulating, storing, retrieving, and classifying recorded information
Translations
kybernetika
kibernetika

cybernetics

[ˌsaɪbəˈnetɪks] NSINGcibernética f

cybernetics

[ˌsaɪbərˈnɛtɪks] ncybernétique f

cybernetics

[ˌsaɪbəˈnɛtɪks] nsgcibernetica

cy·ber·net·ics

n. cibernética, estudio del uso de medios electrónicos y mecanismos de comunicación aplicados a sistemas biológicos tales como los sistemas nervioso y cerebral.
References in periodicals archive ?
8) In the years following the end of the Second World War, many cyberneticists experimented with these simple robots, usually inspired by animals, which moved in reaction to certain stimuli, such as changes in light or obstacles on their path: comparable to Grey Walter's Turtles, which owe their name to the shape of the plastic shelves covering their circuits, were, for example, Norbert Wiener's robotic Moth and Bedbug, and Claude E.
The coherence of "machine credibility" as a legal construct depends on whether the construct promotes decisional accuracy, not on what cyberneticists or metaphysicists have to say about whether a machine can ever achieve "real boy" status.
Broadcast in March 1963, Time On Our Hands was a docu-fiction about the city of the future--Holyhead in 1988--imagining a world in which the Russians got to the Moon first (in 1967), mass unemployment is rife as a result of increasing automation, cyberneticists have become hill farmers and the core problem is 'how to spend a golden lifetime, what to do with so much time'.
At first Lotman appealed for support to mathematicians and pioneering cyberneticists, who would add the gleam of science to his enterprise while he grafted a human face onto theirs.