cyberterrorism


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cyberterrorism

(ˈsaɪbəˌtɛrərɪzəm)
n
1. (Law) the illegal use of computers and the internet to achieve some goal
2. (Computer Science) the illegal use of computers and the internet to achieve some goal
ˈcyberˌterrorist n
Translations

cyberterrorism

[ˈsaɪbəˌterərɪsm] Nciberterrorismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
BRUSSELS, July 9 (KUNA) -- The EU ministers of interior held an informal meeting in Luxembourg on Thursday, and amongst the topics discussed were the recent terrorist attacks in Kuwait, Tunisia and France, and cyberterrorism.
Director Michael Mann - who gave us the much-admired Heat - turns to the topic of cyberterrorism.
Morgan Wright, an internationally recognized expert on cybersecurity and US law enforcement, serves as an advisor and media analyst on identity security, cybersecurity, cyberterrorism and technology-related crime investigations.
There are four major categories of cyberthreats to national security, each with a different time horizon and (in principle) different solutions: cyberwar and economic espionage, which are largely associated with states, and cybercrime and cyberterrorism, which are mostly associated with nonstate actors.
Unfortunately, the Internet also has become a global platform for cyberterrorism, which poses a direct threat to the national security of all states and, by extension, to international security.
He avoids highly technical explanation as he provides descriptions of various kinds of attacks, threats, and fraudulent activities related to personal and organizational digital resources, such as cyberterrorism, hijacking, phishing, spamming, viruses, and identity theft, and ways to combat them.
Even if you are right about the fact of being attacked, initial diagnoses are often wrong," Professor Peter Sommer, an expert on cyberterrorism at the London School of Economics, said.
The triple threat of cybercrime, cyberterrorism, and asymmetric information warfare is here to stay.
The other slender volumes take similar approaches, as in Policing the Internet, with articles debating, among other subjects, whether the government should regulate the Internet, whether cyberterrorism is a serious threat, and whether social-networking sites contribute to crime.
Cyberterrorism has become a buzzword of sorts because the severity--and existence--of the threat is debated.
It considers diversification of sources, securing infrastructure, cyberterrorism, vulnerability assessment, and other concerns.
From the future of cyberterrorism to the application of the Fourth Amendment to searches of digital media to the potential for using the open source software model to prevent computer crime, the following collection of articles represents a mere snapshot of that co-evolution.