cyclothymia


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Related to cyclothymia: dysthymia

cy·clo·thy·mi·a

 (sī′klə-thī′mē-ə)
n.
A mood disorder characterized by alternating periods of elevated and depressed mood that are milder than those typical of bipolar disorder. Also called cyclothymic disorder.

cy′clo·thy′mic (-mĭk) adj. & n.

cyclothymia

(ˌsaɪkləʊˈθaɪmɪə; ˌsɪk-)
n
(Psychiatry) psychiatry a condition characterized by periodical swings of mood between excitement and depression, activity and inactivity. See also manic-depressive
ˌcycloˈthymic, ˌcycloˈthymiˌac adj, n

cy•clo•thy•mi•a

(ˌsaɪ kləˈθaɪ mi ə, ˌsɪk lə-)

n.
a mild bipolar disorder characterized by mood swings between elation and depression.
[1920–25; cyclo- + -thymia]
cy`clo•thy′mic, adj.

cyclothymia

a temperament characterized by cyclic alterations of mood between elation and depression. — cyclothyme, n. — cyclothymic, adj.
See also: Moods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cyclothymia - a mild bipolar disorder that persists over a long time
bipolar disorder, manic depression, manic depressive illness, manic-depressive psychosis - a mental disorder characterized by episodes of mania and depression
Translations

cy·clo·thy·mi·a

n. ciclotimia, personalidad cíclica con trastornos de agitación y depresión.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frequent and recurring periods of hypomania and depression lasting over a period of two years, one year in children, characterizes cyclothymic disorder or cyclothymia.
Type I is the classic manic-depressive illness; type II is characterized by chronic treatment-resistant depression punctuated by hypomanic episodes; and cyclothymia leads to chronic fluctuations in mood.
The sole practitioner provides psychiatric evaluation services and electroconvulsive therapy and treats a variety of mental health conditions such as Adjustment Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism, Bipolar Disorder, Delusional Disorder, Dysthymia, Cyclothymia, and Eating Disorders.
They stated that the scale could be useful in searching for rapid-cycling BB, cyclothymia, seasonal mood disorder and manic and/or mixed states triggered by antidepressants because it was able to evaluate both manic and depressive symptoms simultaneously ISS is composed of 15 items, while four subscales emerged as a result of factor analyses: activation, depression index, perceived conflict, and well-being.
Suffice to mention, anti-impulsivity, anti-suicidality, anti-aggressivity, dual diagnosis, schizo-affective, augmentation in unipolar depression, cyclothymia, cycloid psychosis, Klein–Levine syndrome, borderline personality, clozapine-induced neutropenia, augmentation in schizophrenia, psychogenic polydipsia, just to name few.
The hypomanic episode is also attested, as well as cyclothymia and mixed states.
Dissociative experiences differentiate bipolar-II from unipolar depressed patients: the mediating role of cyclothymia and the Type A behaviour speed and impatience subscale.
Making the distinction between bipolar disorder and DMDD becomes even more complex in the situation of "other specified bipolar and related disorders," which allows for short or subsyndromal hypomanic episodes with major depression, hypomania without depression, or short-duration cyclothymia.
The highs of cyclothymia are characterized by symptoms of an elevated mood (hypomanic symptoms), which resemble those of mania but are less severe.
Jamison actually uses this point to illustrate the close relationship between manic depression and the artistic temperament, and to argue that while the illness can be seasonal (circadian), one-third of those with cyclothymia "eventually [develop] full syndromal depression, hypomania, or mania" (15).
Biographies by David Brun-Lambert and Sylvia Hampton can only speculate about chemical imbalances, schizophrenia, cyclothymia, and manic depression, all underscored by Simone's inclination to skip daily meds.
5 These concepts were developed by the German psychiatrist Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926) who, using Kahlbaum's concept of cyclothymia, categorised and studied the natural course of untreated bipolar patients.