cynical


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cyn·i·cal

 (sĭn′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Believing or showing the belief that people are motivated chiefly by base or selfish concerns; skeptical of the motives of others: a cynical dismissal of the politician's promise to reform the campaign finance system.
2. Selfishly or callously calculating: showed a cynical disregard for the safety of his troops in his efforts to advance his reputation.
3. Negative or pessimistic, as from world-weariness: a cynical view of the average voter's intelligence.
4. Expressing jaded or scornful skepticism or negativity: cynical laughter.

cyn′i·cal·ly adv.
cyn′i·cal·ness n.

cynical

(ˈsɪnɪkəl)
adj
1. distrustful or contemptuous of virtue, esp selflessness in others; believing the worst of others, esp that all acts are selfish
2. sarcastic; mocking
3. showing contempt for accepted standards of behaviour, esp of honesty or morality: the politician betrayed his promises in a cynical way.
ˈcynically adv
ˈcynicalness n

cyn•i•cal

(ˈsɪn ɪ kəl)

adj.
1. distrusting or disparaging the motives or sincerity of others.
2. showing contempt for accepted standards of honesty or morality, esp. by actions that exploit the scruples of others.
3. bitterly or sneeringly distrustful, contemptuous, or pessimistic.
4. (cap.) cynic.
[1580–90]
cyn′i•cal•ly, adv.
cyn′i•cal•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cynical - believing the worst of human nature and motivescynical - believing the worst of human nature and motives; having a sneering disbelief in e.g. selflessness of others
distrustful - having or showing distrust; "a man of distrustful nature"; "my experience...in other fields of law has made me distrustful of rules of thumb generally"- B.N.Cardozo; "vigilant and distrustful superintendence"- Thomas Jefferson

cynical

adjective
2. unbelieving, sceptical, disillusioned, pessimistic, disbelieving, mistrustful My experiences have made me cynical about relationships.
unbelieving optimistic, hopeful

cynical

adjective
Marked by or displaying contemptuous mockery of the motives or virtues of others:
Translations
ساخِر، تَهَكُّمـي
cynický
kynisk
ciničan
háîskur, bituryrtur, kÿnískur
cinikasciniškaiciniškascinizmas
cinisks
cynický

cynical

[ˈsɪnɪkəl] ADJcínico

cynical

[ˈsɪnɪkəl] adj
[person] → cynique; [view, attitude] → cynique
[attempt, ploy, manipulation] → cynique

cynical

adj
zynisch; he was very cynical about iter äußerte sich sehr zynisch dazu
Cynical (Philos) → kynisch, zynisch

cynical

[ˈsɪnɪkl] adjcinico/a

cynical

(ˈsinikəl) adjective
inclined to believe the worst, especially about people. a cynical attitude.
ˈcynically adverb
ˈcynic noun
a person who believes the worst about everyone. He is a cynic – he thinks no-one is really unselfish.
ˈcynicism (-sizəm) noun
References in classic literature ?
Usually, when Lena referred to her life in the country at all, she dismissed it with a single remark, humorous or mildly cynical.
There was a certain cynical ring in her father's voice that was unlike his usual hesitating abstraction.
During the night-watches some cynical old sailors will crawl into them and coil themselves away there for a nap.
Jurgis was vexed when the cynical Jokubas translated these signs with sarcastic comments, offering to take them to the secret rooms where the spoiled meats went to be doctored.
A learned man in a cynical and torn dress holding an open book in his hand.
That is the cream of the joke," he replied, poising his heels on the ice so that his skates stood vertically at legs' length from him, and looking at them with a cynical air.
He plumed himself on belonging to the class of cynical philosophers who could never be "taken in" by women,--putting them, one and all, unto the same category, as SUSPICIOUS.
The noble and distinguished air of Athos, those flashes of greatness which from time to time broke out from the shade in which he voluntarily kept himself, that unalterable equality of temper which made him the most pleasant companion in the world, that forced and cynical gaiety, that bravery which might have been termed blind if it had not been the result of the rarest coolness-such qualities attracted more than the esteem, more than the friendship of D'Artagnan; they attracted his admiration.
The cynical indifference of the sea to the merits of human suffering and courage, laid bare in this ridiculous, panic-tainted performance extorted from the dire extremity of nine good and honourable seamen, revolted me.
Indeed, in what she had said there was something so cynical and unveiled as to pass all bounds.
She was keen, sarcastic, unimaginative, prematurely cynical, remaining critical and unmoved in the most impressive scenes, inclined to dissect all my favourite poems, and especially contemptous towards the German lyrics which were my pet literature at that time.
It is not supposable that he intended a satire upon Babcock's own asceticism, for this would have been a truly cynical stroke.