cynicism


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cyn·i·cism

 (sĭn′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. An attitude of scornful or jaded negativity, especially a general distrust of the integrity or professed motives of others: the public cynicism aroused by governmental scandals.
2. A scornfully or jadedly negative comment or act: "She arrived at a philosophy of her own, all made up of her private notations and cynicisms" (Henry James).
3. Cynicism The beliefs of the ancient Cynics.

cynicism

(ˈsɪnɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. the attitude or beliefs of a cynic
2. a cynical action, remark, idea, etc

Cynicism

(ˈsɪnɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the doctrines of the Cynics

cyn•i•cism

(ˈsɪn əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. cynical disposition or belief.
2. a cynical remark.
3. (cap.) the doctrines of the Cynics.
[1665–75]

Cynicism

a Greek philosophy of the 4th century B.C. advocating the doctrines that virtue is the only good, that the essence of virtue is self-control and individual freedom, and that surrender to any external influence is beneath the dignity of man. — Cynic, n.Cynical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
the holding or expressing of opinions that reveal disbelief and sometimes disdain for commonly held human values and virtues. Also called cynism. See also philosophy. — cynic, n.cynical, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cynicism - a cynical feeling of distrust
pessimism - the feeling that things will turn out badly

cynicism

noun
1. scepticism, pessimism, sarcasm, misanthropy, sardonicism I found Ben's cynicism wearing at times.
2. disbelief, doubt, scepticism, mistrust This talk betrays a certain cynicism about free trade.
Quotations
"Cynicism is intellectual dandyism without the coxcomb's feathers" [George Meredith The Egoist]
Translations
cynismus
kyniskhedkynisme
kyynisyys
cinizam
cinizmus
meinhæîni, kaldhæîni; kÿnismi
cynizmus
cynism
kötümserlik

cynicism

[ˈsɪnɪsɪzəm] Ncinismo m

cynicism

[ˈsɪnɪsɪzəm] ncynisme m

cynicism

n
no plZynismus m
(= cynical remark)zynische Bemerkung
Cynicism (Philos) → Kynismus m, → Zynismus m

cynicism

[ˈsɪnɪsɪzm] ncinismo

cynical

(ˈsinikəl) adjective
inclined to believe the worst, especially about people. a cynical attitude.
ˈcynically adverb
ˈcynic noun
a person who believes the worst about everyone. He is a cynic – he thinks no-one is really unselfish.
ˈcynicism (-sizəm) noun
References in classic literature ?
But not so much as her cynicism in the long dialogue with her lover which followed.
To gaze into the depths of blue of the child's eyes and pronounce their loveliness a trick of premature cunning was to be guilty of a cynicism in preference to which I naturally preferred to abjure my judgment and, so far as might be, my agitation.
I evaded all her moves; but when at last I decided to give her a hearing, I confess it needed all my cynicism to resist her air of innocence, of pathetic devotion.
Erskine soon found plenty of themes for his newly begotten cynicism.
The judges themselves appeared to be stupefied, and the jury manifested tokens of disgust for cynicism so unexpected in a man of fashion.
After sitting in silence a little while longer, Hunsden rose, and was quietly bidding me good evening; the polite, considerate manner in which he offered me his hand (a thing he had never done before), convinced me that he thought I had made a terrible fool of myself; and that, ruined and thrown away as I was, it was no time for sarcasm or cynicism, or indeed for anything but indulgence and forbearance.
His dark eyes flashed fatally, away from us, in the direction of the shy dummy; and then he went on with cultivated cynicism.
It is the doctrine of universal experience professed with a cynicism that is really most extraordinary, and which, presenting itself in a young woman of considerable education, appears to me to be the judgment of a society.
What has it all been about, that's what I want to know," he went on with quiet cynicism.
The mysticism that was buried deep under all the cynicism of his experience was awake and moving in the depths.
The judge leaned back in his chair with a luxuriance in which it was hard to separate the cynicism and the admiration.
Their pleasantry and their piety show cracks, their wit becomes cynicism, their unselfishness hypocrisy; they feel and produce discomfort wherever they go.