cypress


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Related to cypress: Cyprus
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cypress
Monterey cypress
Cupressus macrocarpa

cy·press

 (sī′prĭs)
n.
1.
a. Any of various evergreen trees or shrubs of the genus Cupressus, native to Eurasia and North America and having opposite, scalelike leaves and globose woody cones.
b. Any of several similar or related coniferous trees, such as the bald cypress.
c. The wood of any of these trees.
2. Cypress branches used as a symbol of mourning.

[Middle English cipres, from Old French, from Late Latin cypressus, probably blend of Latin cupressus and cyparissus (from Greek kuparissos).]

cypress

(ˈsaɪprəs)
n
1. (Plants) any coniferous tree of the N temperate genus Cupressus, having dark green scalelike leaves and rounded cones: family Cupressaceae. See also Leyland cypress
2. (Plants) any of several similar and related trees, such as the widely cultivated Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Lawson's cypress), of the western US
3. (Plants) any of various other coniferous trees, esp the swamp cypress
4. (Forestry) the wood of any of these trees
[Old English cypresse, from Latin cyparissus, from Greek kuparissos; related to Latin cupressus]

cypress

(ˈsaɪprəs) or

cyprus

n
(Clothing & Fashion) a fabric, esp a fine silk, lawn, or crepelike material, often black and worn as mourning
[C14 cyprus from the island of Cyprus]

cy•press1

(ˈsaɪ prəs)

n.
1. any of several evergreen coniferous trees of the genus Cupressus, having dark-green, scalelike, overlapping leaves.
2. any of various other coniferous trees of allied genera, as the bald cypress.
3. the wood of these trees.
[before 1000; < Late Latin cypressus, appar. b. Latin cupressus and cyparissus < Greek kypárissos]

cy•press2

or cy•prus

(ˈsaɪ prəs)

n.
a fine, thin fabric resembling lawn or crepe, formerly used in black for mourning garments and trimmings.
[1350–1400; Middle English cipre(s), cyprus, after Cyprus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cypress - wood of any of various cypress trees especially of the genus Cupressuscypress - wood of any of various cypress trees especially of the genus Cupressus
cypress tree, cypress - any of numerous evergreen conifers of the genus Cupressus of north temperate regions having dark scalelike leaves and rounded cones
cypress pine - any of several evergreen trees or shrubs of Australia and northern New Caledonia
juniper - coniferous shrub or small tree with berrylike cones
sequoia, redwood - either of two huge coniferous California trees that reach a height of 300 feet; sometimes placed in the Taxodiaceae
pond bald cypress, southern cypress, swamp cypress, Taxodium distichum, bald cypress - common cypress of southeastern United States having trunk expanded at base; found in coastal swamps and flooding river bottoms
bald cypress, pond cypress, Taxodium ascendens - smaller than and often included in the closely related Taxodium distichum
Mexican swamp cypress, Montezuma cypress, Taxodium mucronatum - cypress of river valleys of Mexican highlands
Callitris quadrivalvis, sandarac tree, Tetraclinis articulata, sandarac - large coniferous evergreen tree of North Africa and Spain having flattened branches and scalelike leaves yielding a hard fragrant wood; bark yields a resin used in varnishes
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.cypress - any of numerous evergreen conifers of the genus Cupressus of north temperate regions having dark scalelike leaves and rounded conescypress - any of numerous evergreen conifers of the genus Cupressus of north temperate regions having dark scalelike leaves and rounded cones
Cupressus, genus Cupressus - type genus of Cupressaceae
cypress - wood of any of various cypress trees especially of the genus Cupressus
Cupressus goveniana, gowen cypress - small sometimes shrubby tree native to California; often used as an ornamental; in some classification systems includes the pygmy cypress and the Santa Cruz cypress
Cupressus goveniana pigmaea, Cupressus pigmaea, pygmy cypress - rare small cypress native to northern California; sometimes considered the same species as gowen cypress
Cupressus abramsiana, Cupressus goveniana abramsiana, Santa Cruz cypress - rare California cypress taller than but closely related to gowen cypress and sometimes considered the same species
Arizona cypress, Cupressus arizonica - Arizona timber tree with bluish silvery foliage
Cupressus guadalupensis, Guadalupe cypress - relatively low wide-spreading endemic on Guadalupe Island; cultivated for its bluish foliage
Cupressus macrocarpa, Monterey cypress - tall California cypress endemic on Monterey Bay; widely used for ornament as well as reforestation and shelterbelt planting
cedar of Goa, Cupressus lusitanica, Mexican cypress, Portuguese cypress - tall spreading evergreen found in Mexico having drooping branches; believed to have been introduced into Portugal from Goa
Cupressus sempervirens, Italian cypress, Mediterranean cypress - tall Eurasian cypress with thin grey bark and ascending branches
galbulus - the seed-producing cone of a cypress tree
conifer, coniferous tree - any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones
Translations
شَجرة السَّرو
cypřiš
cypres
sypressi
ciprusciprusfa
kÿprusviîur
kiparisas
ciprese
cyprus
cypress
serviservi ağacı

cypress

[ˈsaɪprɪs] Nciprés m

cypress

[ˈsaɪprəs] n (= tree) → cyprès m

cypress

nZypresse f

cypress

[ˈsaɪprɪs] ncipresso
Lawson's cypress → cedro bianco

cypress

(ˈsaipris) noun
a type of evergreen tree.
References in classic literature ?
Here once, through an alley Titanic, Of cypress, I roamed with my Soul -- Of cypress, with Psyche, my Soul.
I gather the larkspur Over the hillside, Blown mid the chaos Of boulder and bellbine; Hating the tyrant Who made me an outcast, Who of his leisure Now spares me no moment: Drinking the mountain spring, Shading at noon-day Under the cypress My limbs from the sun glare.
They had not gone a quarter of a league when at the meeting of two paths they saw coming towards them some six shepherds dressed in black sheepskins and with their heads crowned with garlands of cypress and bitter oleander.
They were going along conversing in this way, when they saw descending a gap between two high mountains some twenty shepherds, all clad in sheepskins of black wool, and crowned with garlands which, as afterwards appeared, were, some of them of yew, some of cypress.
The grass wore the deep tint of the cypress, and the heads of its blades hung droopingly, and hither and thither among it were many small unsightly hillocks, low and narrow, and not very long, that had the aspect of graves, but were not; although over and all about them the rue and the rosemary clambered.
There is a cross, you see, beneath yon little cypress.
He replied, Each has its appropriate produce, and appointed season, during the continuance of which it is fresh and blooming, and during their absence dry and withered; to neither of which states is the cypress exposed, being always flourishing; and of this nature are the azads, or religious independents.
The slanting light of the setting sun quivers on the sea-like expanse of the river; the shivery canes, and the tall, dark cypress, hung with wreaths of dark, funereal moss, glow in the golden ray, as the heavily-laden steamboat marches onward.
Studying it for a minute, he concluded that it was composed of three cypress trees, and he knew that nothing else than the hand of man could have planted them there.
The cypress there and myrtle twined their boughs, Significant, in baleful brotherhood.
Accordingly I turned up a by-path to the right; I had not followed it far ere it brought me, as I expected, into the fields, amidst which, just before me, stretched a long and lofty white wall enclosing, as it seemed from the foliage showing above, some thickly planted nursery of yew and cypress, for of that species were the branches resting on the pale parapets, and crowding gloomily about a massive cross, planted doubtless on a central eminence and extending its arms, which seemed of black marble, over the summits of those sinister trees.
One morning about daybreak I found a canoe and crossed over a chute to the main shore -- it was only two hundred yards -- and paddled about a mile up a crick amongst the cypress woods, to see if I couldn't get some berries.