dactyl


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dac·tyl

 (dăk′təl)
n.
1.
a. A metrical foot consisting of one accented syllable followed by two unaccented, as in flattery.
b. A metrical foot in quantitative verse consisting of one long syllable followed by two short syllables.
2. A finger, toe, or similar part or structure; a digit.

[Middle English dactil, from Latin dactylus, from Greek daktulos, finger, toe, dactyl (the three syllables of a dactyl being likened to the three phalanges of a finger ).]

dac·tyl′ic (-tĭl′ĭk) adj. & n.
dac·tyl′i·cal·ly adv.

dactyl

(ˈdæktɪl)
n
1. (Poetry) prosody Also called: dactylic a metrical foot of three syllables, one long followed by two short (¯˘˘). Compare bacchius
2. (Anatomy) zoology any digit of a vertebrate
[C14: via Latin from Greek daktulos finger, dactyl, comparing the finger's three joints to the three syllables]

dac•tyl

(ˈdæk tɪl)

n.
1. a prosodic foot of three syllables, one long followed by two short in quantitative meter, or one stressed followed by two unstressed in accentual meter, as in humanly.
2. a finger or toe.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin dactylus < Greek dáktylos finger]
dac•tyl′ic, adj.

-dactyl

var. of -dactylous, esp. with nouns: pterodactyl.

dactyl

- Your dactyls are your toes.
See also related terms for toes.

dactyl

a digit; a finger or toe. See also measurement.
See also: Fingers and Toes
a foot of three syllables, the flrst long or accented, the following two short or unaccented. — dactylist, n. — dactylic, adj.
See also: Verse

dactyl

A metrical foot of one stressed syllable followed by two unstressed ones.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dactyl - a metrical unit with stressed-unstressed-unstressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
2.dactyl - a finger or toe in human beings or corresponding body part in other vertebrates
craniate, vertebrate - animals having a bony or cartilaginous skeleton with a segmented spinal column and a large brain enclosed in a skull or cranium
phalanx - any of the bones of the fingers or toes
appendage, extremity, member - an external body part that projects from the body; "it is important to keep the extremities warm"
minimus - the fifth digit; the little finger or little toe
finger - any of the terminal members of the hand (sometimes excepting the thumb); "her fingers were long and thin"
toe - one of the digits of the foot
nail - horny plate covering and protecting part of the dorsal surface of the digits
Translations

dactyl

[ˈdæktɪl] Ndáctilo m

dactyl

n (Zool) → Zehe f, → Finger m; (Liter) → Daktylus m

dac·tyl

n. dáctilo, dedo de la mano o del pie.
References in classic literature ?
Pain is always by the side of joy, the spondee by the dactyl.
The abbe, who was quite innocent of Latin, nodded his head, in cadence, at every roll which La Fontaine impressed upon his body, according to the undulations of the dactyls and spondees.
Try breaking off either the fixed finger or dactyl portions of the claws with a pair of needle-nosed pliers before trying to rig the crab.
Through its rough, "masculine" note, the Doric mode (using dactyl, anapest, and peon) was regarded as appropriate for austere, warlike states.
It's written in Latin hendecasyllabics, a meter Frost lifted from Catullus: an eleven-syllable line organized as trochee, dactyl, trochee, trochee, trochee.
Among the poetic forms included are rondeau, terza rima, limerick, tetractys, cinquain, sonnet, pantoum, haiku, double dactyl, and epigram.
He is correct that dactyl does not properly describe it.
They rode, Flax first, into the empty street and bicycled side by side until at the second intersection Leo with a wave turned towards school and Flax with an arm raised in answer went straight ahead, toward today's job, selling shoes at Dactyl.
Clare here uses to serious purpose the insights he facetiously develops in "Style," alternating regular iambic lines and those beginning with a dactyl or trochee to mimic the soft then forceful breath of the wind and the inward melodies and outswelling raptures of the whitethroat's song.
Pessary It's a wild boar, ventures a friend, duped by the dactyl peccary, while to me sheer euphony suggests Pessary (n.
Paul E Dactyl Still thinking Nathaniel will win it.
According to the conception presented here, the dactylic foot is the least natural of the most frequent feet: the iambic, the trochee, the anapest and the dactyl.