dactylic


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dac·tyl

 (dăk′təl)
n.
1.
a. A metrical foot consisting of one accented syllable followed by two unaccented, as in flattery.
b. A metrical foot in quantitative verse consisting of one long syllable followed by two short syllables.
2. A finger, toe, or similar part or structure; a digit.

[Middle English dactil, from Latin dactylus, from Greek daktulos, finger, toe, dactyl (the three syllables of a dactyl being likened to the three phalanges of a finger ).]

dac·tyl′ic (-tĭl′ĭk) adj. & n.
dac·tyl′i·cal·ly adv.

dactylic

(dækˈtɪlɪk)
adj
(Poetry) of, relating to, or having a dactyl: dactylic verse.
n
(Poetry) a variant of dactyl1
dacˈtylically adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dactylic - of or consisting of dactyls; "dactylic meter"
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
Translations

dactylic

[dækˈtɪlɪk] ADJdactílico

dactylic

adjdaktylisch
References in classic literature ?
At any rate the double coincidence of a dactylic line, and an ending [Greek], seems conclusive as to the familiarity of the writer of the "Odyssey" with the Iliadic line.
His brief 'Andromeda' is one of the best English poems in the classical dactylic hexameter.
And I think that I have an indistinct recollection of his mentioning a complex Cretic rhythm; also a dactylic or heroic, and he arranged them in some manner which I do not quite understand, making the rhythms equal in the rise and fall of the foot, long and short alternating; and, unless I am mistaken, he spoke of an iambic as well as of a trochaic rhythm, and assigned to them short and long quantities.
Rhythm is constructed, for example, by the percussive dactylic beat of the "Seventh Eclogue" and the iambic one of "Letter to My Wife," both of which have been restored in the translations into English by Zsuzsanna Ozsvath and Frederick Turner in Foamy Sky: The Major Poems of Miklos Radnoti.
The crimson ran rapidly down to meet the black ocean, changing and doubling and spreading as it ran"; this sentence gains its effect of motion by listing present participles; it also evokes dactylic metre (crimson ran rapidly, changing and doubling and spreading), whose high proportion of unstressed syllables traditionally evokes speed.
The recurrence of such phrases as 'thrilled with chilly horror' imparts a falling rhythm--fundamentally trochaic, with occasional dactylic feet to the language that conveys the experience.
It is composed of 9,896 lines in dactylic hexameter.
Although the lines can quite effectively be scanned as trochaic octameter with some dactylic substitutions, Tennyson insisted on a scansion that, I think, would out-spring Hopkins:
One conspicuous case in point is the "heroic rhythm," the dactylic hexameter, where the longest syllable in the foot comes first--perpetuated by the venerable Greek and Roman epic tradition.
At this point Thoreau, having interrupted his own cadence with other people's jingles and slogans, re-establishes a strong rhythm for his own voice by using this ten-syllable line propelled by the vigorous repetition of a compact, regular dactylic foot:
Because of the character of accentuation, dactylic rhymes are absolutely impossible in French.
AF When I was getting my PhD at Stanford and writing The Ghost of Meter, I scanned the poetry of Whitman, Dickinson, Ginsberg, Lorde, and other poets and discovered that on some probably unconscious level, based on their patterns of imagery and meaning, iambic pentameter represented power and patriarchy to these poets, while the dactylic meter was linked to intuition and the body and a revolutionary approach to the world.