dactylic


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dac·tyl

 (dăk′təl)
n.
1.
a. A metrical foot consisting of one accented syllable followed by two unaccented, as in flattery.
b. A metrical foot in quantitative verse consisting of one long syllable followed by two short syllables.
2. A finger, toe, or similar part or structure; a digit.

[Middle English dactil, from Latin dactylus, from Greek daktulos, finger, toe, dactyl (the three syllables of a dactyl being likened to the three phalanges of a finger ).]

dac·tyl′ic (-tĭl′ĭk) adj. & n.
dac·tyl′i·cal·ly adv.

dactylic

(dækˈtɪlɪk)
adj
(Poetry) of, relating to, or having a dactyl: dactylic verse.
n
(Poetry) a variant of dactyl1
dacˈtylically adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dactylic - of or consisting of dactyls; "dactylic meter"
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
Translations

dactylic

[dækˈtɪlɪk] ADJdactílico

dactylic

adjdaktylisch
References in classic literature ?
His brief 'Andromeda' is one of the best English poems in the classical dactylic hexameter.
And I think that I have an indistinct recollection of his mentioning a complex Cretic rhythm; also a dactylic or heroic, and he arranged them in some manner which I do not quite understand, making the rhythms equal in the rise and fall of the foot, long and short alternating; and, unless I am mistaken, he spoke of an iambic as well as of a trochaic rhythm, and assigned to them short and long quantities.
At any rate the double coincidence of a dactylic line, and an ending [Greek], seems conclusive as to the familiarity of the writer of the "Odyssey" with the Iliadic line.
Instead, Susius utilises dactylic hexameters, more commonly for epic or narrative poetry but also the most common metre of Latin poetry.
But its dying dactylic fall precludes a satisfyingly emphatic rhyme with "be," a phenomenon that is reinforced by a reader's tendency to accelerate through the line break of "be / Wisdom," one of the poem's few enjambments.
A second example concerns the acoustic jingle, caused by the rhyming words, the high number of a-sounds, and the dactylic rhythm, that portrays the gallop of mules in "on and on they went, upwards, downwards, sidewards" (polla d'ananta katanta paranta).
Lucretius chose to write a long poem about Epicurean philosophy in dactylic hexameter, the same verse pattern employed by Homer for his epic narratives.
In Nicaragua, where he was born, there has always been a custom of celebrating him by composing mini-essays on tiny themes, which decorate the newspapersessays on Dario's mastery of classical meter in a dozen forms, or his innovative 13-syllable alexandrines, or his handiness at dactylic feet, or his debt to the Spanish poets of the Centuries of Gold.
Syphilis, an epyllion written in Virgilian dactylic hexameter and dedicated to Cardinal Pietro Bembo, was a 16th-century best-seller: by 1935 there were over a hundred editions, including 15 in Italian and seven in English.
The most common meters are elegiac couplets, Sapphic and Alcaic stanzas, and dactylic hexameters.
Apparently, on looking for trochees, dactylic hexameters, iambic pentameters, rhyme schemes, and not finding them, Dohne should have forgiven the Zulu bards if at least they had composed some poems dealing directly with the stars, the moon, and the Milky Way.
Maria Rybakova, a professor of Classics in the US and the author of prose fiction in Russian, pulls off a version of this feat in Gnedich, a slim novel in twelve cantos composed in blocks of syllabic verse enlivened by flourishes of dactylic hexameter.