daggy

daggy

(ˈdæɡɪ)
adj, daggier or daggiest
1. untidy; dishevelled
2. eccentric
[from dag2]
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the 500 attendees at the 14th biennial Merton conference were 53 Daggy Scholars from 23 colleges, universities and seminaries in the United States, Canada and China.
Broken-hearted Daughter Lesley, John, John, Gill, Beverley, Daggy and all Great-grandchildren.
Shaklee is trying to bring our health span closer to our life span, and we believe nutrition can make a difference," comments Chief Science Officer Bruce Daggy, Ph.
Housing Minister Tim Mander said Daggy Jumper Day was an initiative of Brisbane Youth Service and raised funds to help homeless and vulnerable young people in Brisbane.
That set off quite a debate but the perception for many kids remains that Information Books are the daggy cousins of the book family.
The demonstrable benefits of music therapy as a group or individual therapy intervention addressing the psychological and physical functioning of cancer patients have been illustrated in numerous studies (Aldridge, 1995; Aldridge, 1996, 1999; Bailey, 1984; Bonde, 2000, 2005; Burns, Harbuz, Hucklebridge, & Bunt, 2001; Burns, 2009; Burns, 2001; Burns, Sledge, Fuller, Daggy and Monahan 2005; Cassileth, Vickers & Magill, 2003; Dileo & Bradt, 2005; Hanser et al.
Tepper RS, Williams-Nkomo T, Martinez T, Kisling J, Coates C, Daggy J.
Some kids still think the library is daggy We will just work with the ones that do not.
Our Samson was sent off around evens but was one of the first to come off the bridle and had drifted to 100 in running when at least 20 lengths adrift in third behind leader Daggy Boy, who was travelling extremely well under Alan O'Keeffe and had been backed down to 1.
Much criticism from the liberal-Left of the new fundamentalism amounts to nothing more than a secular sneer at a form of life that has a somewhat daggy exterior.
Daggy is, apparently, Australian slang for unfashionable or uncool.