daguerreotype


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daguerreotype

da·guerre·o·type

 (də-gâr′ə-tīp′)
n.
1. An early photographic process with the image made on a light-sensitive silver-coated metallic plate.
2. A photograph made by this process.
tr.v. da·guerre·o·typed, da·guerre·o·typ·ing, da·guerre·o·types
To make a daguerreotype of.

[French, after Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre.]

da·guerre′o·typ′er n.
da·guerre′o·typ′y n.

daguerreotype

(dəˈɡɛrəʊˌtaɪp)
n
1. (Photography) one of the earliest photographic processes, in which the image was produced on iodine-sensitized silver and developed in mercury vapour
2. (Photography) a photograph formed by this process
daˈguerreoˌtyper, daˈguerreoˌtypist n
daˈguerreoˌtypy n

da•guerre•o•type

(dəˈgɛər əˌtaɪp, -i əˌtaɪp)

n., v. -typed, -typ•ing. n.
1. an obsolete photographic process, invented in 1839, in which a picture made on a silver surface sensitized with iodine is developed by exposure to mercury vapor.
2. a picture made by this process.
v.t.
3. to photograph by this process.
[< French (1839), after Latin. J. M. Daguerre; see -o-, -type]
da•guerre′o•typ`er, da•guerre′o•typ`ist, n.
da•guerre`o•typ′ic (-ˈtɪp ɪk) adj.
da•guerre′o•typ′y, n.

daguerreotype

an obsolete form of photography in which images were produced on chemically treated plates of metal or glass. — daguerreotypic, daguerreotypical, adj.daguerreotypist, n.
See also: Photography

daguerreotype

An early type of photographic process using a light-sensitive silver-coated metallic plate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.daguerreotype - a photograph made by an early photographic processdaguerreotype - a photograph made by an early photographic process; the image was produced on a silver plate sensitized to iodine and developed in mercury vapor
photo, photograph, pic, exposure, picture - a representation of a person or scene in the form of a print or transparent slide; recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material
Translations
Daguerreotypie

daguerreotype

nDaguerreotypie f
vtnach dem Daguerreotypieverfahren fotografieren

daguerreotype

[dəˈgɛrəʊˌtaɪp] ndagherrotipo
References in classic literature ?
Springing it open, she gazed at the daguerreotype of a worn little woman with steady gray eyes and a hopeful, pathetic mouth.
Here, in the daguerreotype, was the concrete; much she had grasped from it, and always there seemed an infinite more to grasp.
But this mother was not the Daisy of the plains nor of the daguerreotype.
Alone, except for a certain respectable and orderly young man, an artist in the daguerreotype line, who, for about three months back, had been a lodger in a remote gable,--quite a house by itself, indeed,--with locks, bolts, and oaken bars on all the intervening doors.
Shelby's best hand, who, as he is to be the hero of our story, we must daguerreotype for our readers.
She possessed his sword, there were several old-fashioned daguerreotypes, there was much that had been said of him, stories told of him--and all this had constituted the material out of which she had builded him in her childhood fancy.
Coverage spans from the period of the daguerreotype in 1839 to about 1920.
In 1829, Niepce partnered with another Frenchman, Louis Daguerre, to improve the process further and in 1839 after several years of experimentation, Daguerre developed a more convenient and effective method of photography called daguerreotype.
It would take 150 years for technology to catch up to Zahn with the invention of the daguerreotype, the world's first mainstream photographic process.
It was After choosing a series of daguerreotype photographic images made in the 1990s - the daguerreotype itself harking back to the early 19th Century - he then had the plates scanned and converted into digital files.
Strikingly, organized law enforcement arrived in the States on the streets of New York City (1845) within the same decade as the daguerreotype process of photography was invented (1839), and the earliest photos in this collection of three hundred are mesmerizing.
Sarah Kate Gillespie's The Early American Daguerreotype represents years of study into the American origins of photography, and it makes important contributions to the literature on this complex historical phenomenon.