dainty

(redirected from daintier)
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dain·ty

 (dān′tē)
adj. dain·ti·er, dain·ti·est
1. Delicately beautiful or charming and usually small: dainty slippers.
2. Delicious; tasty: a dainty dish.
3. Fastidious or finicky: "They chided [them] for being too dainty to eat army rations" (Stephen Berry).
4. Frail in constitution or health: "Such heroines have [been]replaced by the dainty young thing who faints away at the sight of a six-shooter" (Molly Gloss).
n. pl. dain·ties
Something delicious; a delicacy.

[Middle English deinte, excellent, excellence, from Old French deintie, from Latin dignitās, from dignus, worthy; see dek- in Indo-European roots.]

dain′ti·ly adv.
dain′ti·ness n.

dainty

(ˈdeɪntɪ)
adj, -tier or -tiest
1. delicate or elegant: a dainty teacup.
2. pleasing to the taste; choice; delicious: a dainty morsel.
3. refined, esp excessively genteel; fastidious
n, pl -ties
(Cookery) a choice piece of food, esp a small cake or sweet; delicacy
[C13: from Old French deintié, from Latin dignitās dignity]
ˈdaintily adv
ˈdaintiness n

dain•ty

(ˈdeɪn ti)

adj. -ti•er, -ti•est, adj.
1. of delicate beauty or form.
2. pleasing to the taste dainty pastries.
3. particular; fastidious: a dainty eater.
4. overly particular; finicky.
n.
5. something delicious to the taste; delicacy.
[1175–1225; Middle English deinte worthiness, happiness, delicacy < Anglo-French (Old French deint(i)e) < Latin dignitātem, acc. of dignitās]
dain′ti•ly, adv.
dain′ti•ness, n.
syn: See delicate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dainty - something considered choice to eatdainty - something considered choice to eat  
aliment, alimentation, nourishment, nutriment, sustenance, victuals, nutrition - a source of materials to nourish the body
choice morsel, tidbit, titbit - a small tasty bit of food
savoury, savory - an aromatic or spicy dish served at the end of dinner or as an hors d'oeuvre
confection, sweet - a food rich in sugar
nectar, ambrosia - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
jelly, gelatin - an edible jelly (sweet or pungent) made with gelatin and used as a dessert or salad base or a coating for foods
bone marrow, marrow - very tender and very nutritious tissue from marrowbones
Adj.1.dainty - affectedly dainty or refineddainty - affectedly dainty or refined  
refined - (used of persons and their behavior) cultivated and genteel; "she was delicate and refined and unused to hardship"; "refined people with refined taste"
2.dainty - delicately beautiful; "a dainty teacup"; "an exquisite cameo"
delicate - exquisitely fine and subtle and pleasing; susceptible to injury; "a delicate violin passage"; "delicate china"; "a delicate flavor"; "the delicate wing of a butterfly"
3.dainty - especially pleasing to the taste; "a dainty dish to set before a kind";
tasty - pleasing to the sense of taste; "a tasty morsel"
4.dainty - excessively fastidious and easily disgusted; "too nice about his food to take to camp cooking"; "so squeamish he would only touch the toilet handle with his elbow"
fastidious - giving careful attention to detail; hard to please; excessively concerned with cleanliness; "a fastidious and incisive intellect"; "fastidious about personal cleanliness"

dainty

adjective
1. delicate, pretty, charming, fine, slight, slim, elegant, trim, neat, refined, exquisite, graceful, petite, dinky (Brit. informal) The girls were dainty and feminine.
delicate awkward, coarse, clumsy, ungainly, gauche, uncouth, inelegant, maladroit
3. particular, nice, refined, fussy, scrupulous, fastidious, choosy, picky (informal), finicky, anal retentive, finical They cater for a range of tastes, from the dainty to the extravagant.

dainty

adjective
1. Appealing to refined taste:
noun
Something fine and delicious, especially a food:
Informal: goody.
Translations
سَهْل الكَسْر، وَسيم، أنيق
líbeznýněžný
lækkeryndig
fallega fíngerîur
dailiai
gleznsizsmalcinātstrausls
ljubek

dainty

[ˈdeɪntɪ]
A. ADJ (daintier (compar) (daintiest (superl)))
1. (= delicate) [person, hands, vase] → fino, delicado; [steps] → elegante, delicado; [figure] → delicado; [food, clothes] → exquisito, refinado
a dainty morselun bocado exquisito
2. (= fastidious) → delicado, melindroso
B. Nbocado m exquisito
daintiesexquisiteces fpl

dainty

[ˈdeɪnti] adj [hand, foot, face] → délicat(e), mignon(ne); [flower] → délicat(e), joli(e); [handkerchief, socks, apron] → adorable

dainty

adj (+er)
zierlich; lace, handkerchieffein; movement, musicanmutig; she has dainty little waysbei or an ihr ist alles fein und zierlich
foodappetitlich; dainty morselAppetithappen m
(= refined)geziert, etepetete (inf)
nLeckerei f

dainty

[ˈdeɪntɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (person, figure) → minuto/a; (child, manners) → aggraziato/a; (flowers, gesture) → delicato/a, grazioso/a; (dishes, food) → delicato/a; (dress, shoes) → grazioso/a

dainty

(ˈdeinti) adjective
small or fragile and attractive. a dainty little girl.
ˈdaintily adverb
ˈdaintiness noun
References in classic literature ?
It is sure to cry soon, and a daintier morsel I haven't had for many a long day.
I have seen men enmeshed by a corset cover no prettier, no daintier, than these of yours I have seen on the line.
Even the daintier gentlemen and ladies who had no idea of his secret, and who would have been startled out of more wits than they had, by the monstrous impropriety of his proposing to them 'Come and see what I see
In the Philippines, the daintier, everyday styles of Swarovski are most favored.
The artists range from James Sowerby, whose illustrations helped to propagate botanical knowledge in late 18th-century Britain, to modern British artists such as John Nash, Anthony Gross and Cedric Morris--the latter represented by a painting of a bulky cabbage, somewhat belying those daintier images of the irises that Morris lovingly bred at Benton End in Suffolk.
Blinis are an eastern European pancake similar to fluffy American pancakes, but much daintier.
The military tried to keep female journalists behind friendly lines to report on the war's daintier side.
Jaunty midi skirts chop the leg at its thickest point; stubby, high-fashion hooves cut horizontally across the foot and provide none of the lengthening illusion of a daintier pump.
Charles Whitehead in Campfires of the Everglades (written in 1891) describes it perfectly:"--and flank it with nothing discordant and gross, but with some game bird, and nothing better than an English snipe, and then thank the Lord who giveth us our meat in due season, for never since man had dominion over the fowls of the air has there been cooked a daintier dish.
For a daintier option, Lace Your Face offered a more feminine look, with a range of products offering a number of treatment options.