dais


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da·is

 (dā′ĭs, dī′-)
n.
A raised platform, as in a lecture hall, for speakers or honored guests.

[Middle English deis, from Anglo-Norman, platform, from Late Latin discus, table, from Latin, discus, quoit; see disk.]

dais

(ˈdeɪɪs; deɪs)
n
(Furniture) a raised platform, usually at one end of a hall, used by speakers, etc
[C13: from Old French deis, from Latin discus discus]

da•is

(ˈdeɪ ɪs, ˈdaɪ-, deɪs)

n.
a raised platform, as at the front of a room, for a lectern, throne, seats of honor, etc.
[1225–75; Middle English deis < Anglo-French (Old French dois) < Latin discus quoit; see discus]
lectern, podium, dais, rostrum - A lectern is the stand on which the speaker's notes are placed, the podium is the platform on which the speaker and lectern stand, a dais is a platform for several people, and a rostrum is a platform for one or more.
See also related terms for platform.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dais - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on itdais - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"

dais

noun platform, stage, podium, rostrum, estrade She sat on the dais along with the other guests of honour.
Translations

dais

[ˈdeɪɪs] Nestrado m

dais

[ˈdeɪɪs] nestrade f

dais

nPodium nt

dais

[ˈdeɪɪs] npedana, palco
References in classic literature ?
At the head of the hall, on a dais, was the table of the king, queen, and their son, Prince Uwaine.
For about one quarter of the length of the apartment, the floor was raised by a step, and this space, which was called the dais, was occupied only by the principal members of the family, and visitors of distinction.
Dorian Gray stepped up on the dais with the air of a young Greek martyr, and made a little moue of discontent to Lord Henry, to whom he had rather taken a fancy.
Look here, fool and dolt (for so I may call you, when you don't understand my words, and run away from good fortune), if I had said that my daughter was to throw herself down from a tower, or go roaming the world, as the Infanta Dona Urraca wanted to do, you would be right in not giving way to my will; but if in an instant, in less than the twinkling of an eye, I put the 'Don' and 'my lady' on her back, and take her out of the stubble, and place her under a canopy, on a dais, and on a couch, with more velvet cushions than all the Almohades of Morocco ever had in their family, why won't you consent and fall in with my wishes?
The King and Queen dismounted from their steeds, ascended the steps of the royal box, and seated themselves upon two thrones, decked with purple and gold trapping, upon a dais sheltered by striped canvas.
Each window was draped in green damask curtains, looped up by heavy cords, which made them resemble a vast dais.
Irwine to a carpet-covered dais ornamented with hot-house plants, where she and Miss Anne were to be seated with old Mr.
who occupied the seat of honor under the dais of the bark.
It was not long before the seats on the dais were filled, while the tenants and guests of lesser importance had occupied all the coigns of vantage not reserved.
It was a long chamber with a step separating the dais where the family sat from the lower portion reserved for their dependents.
Well may the court be dim, with wasting candles here and there; well may the fog hang heavy in it, as if it would never get out; well may the stained-glass windows lose their colour and admit no light of day into the place; well may the uninitiated from the streets, who peep in through the glass panes in the door, be deterred from entrance by its owlish aspect and by the drawl, languidly echoing to the roof from the padded dais where the Lord High Chancellor looks into the lantern that has no light in it and where the attendant wigs are all stuck in a fog-bank
What I saw was a solid phalanx of armed men between myself and a dais supporting a great bench of carved sorapus wood.