daisy

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dai·sy

 (dā′zē)
n. pl. dai·sies
1. Any of several plants of the composite family, especially:
a. A widely naturalized Eurasian plant (Leucanthemum vulgare syn. Chrysanthemum leucanthemum) having flower heads with a yellow center and white rays. Also called oxeye daisy, white daisy.
b. A low-growing plant (Bellis perennis) native to Europe and widely naturalized, having flower heads with white or pinkish rays. Also called English daisy.
c. The flower head of any of these plants.
2. Slang One that is deemed excellent or notable.

[Middle English daisie, from Old English dæges ēage : dæges, genitive of dæg, day; see agh- in Indo-European roots + ēage, eye; see okw- in Indo-European roots.]

daisy

(ˈdeɪzɪ)
n, pl -sies
1. (Plants) a small low-growing European plant, Bellis perennis, having a rosette of leaves and flower heads of yellow central disc flowers and pinkish-white outer ray flowers: family Asteraceae (composites)
2. (Plants) Also called: oxeye daisy, marguerite or moon daisy a Eurasian composite plant, Leucanthemum vulgare having flower heads with a yellow centre and white outer rays
3. (Plants) any of various other composite plants having conspicuous ray flowers, such as the Michaelmas daisy and Shasta daisy
4. slang an excellent person or thing
5. pushing up the daisies dead and buried
[Old English dægesēge day's eye]
ˈdaisied adj

dai•sy

(ˈdeɪ zi)

n., pl. -sies.
1. any of various composite plants that have flower heads of a yellow disk and white rays, as the English daisy and oxeye daisy.
2. Slang. someone or something of first-rate quality.
Idioms:
push up daisies, Informal. to be dead and buried.
[before 1000; Middle English dayesye, Old English dægesēge the day's eye]
dai′sied, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.daisy - any of numerous composite plants having flower heads with well-developed ray flowers usually arranged in a single whorldaisy - any of numerous composite plants having flower heads with well-developed ray flowers usually arranged in a single whorl
flower - a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
Bellis perennis, common daisy, English daisy - low-growing Eurasian plant with yellow central disc flowers and pinkish-white outer ray flowers
Translations
kopretinasedmikráskasedmikráska chudobka
bellismarguerittusindfryd
margaritamargarita comúnchiribita
päivänkakkaratuhatkaunokaunokainen
tratinčica
százszorszép
freyjubrá, fagurfífill
ヒナギク
데이지
ramunėsaulutėskaistažiedė
sedmokráska
marjetica
tusensköna
ดอกเดซี่
hoa cúc

daisy

[ˈdeɪzɪ]
A. Nmargarita f
to be pushing up the daisiescriar malvas
B. CPD daisy chain N (lit) → guirnalda f de margaritas (fig) → serie f

daisy

[ˈdeɪzi] n (= flower) → pâquerette f daisy chaindaisy chain nguirlande f de pâquerettesdaisy wheel n (on printer)marguerite fdaisy-wheel printer nimprimante f à marguerite

daisy

nGänseblümchen nt; to be pushing up the daisies (inf)sich (dat)die Radieschen von unten besehen (hum)

daisy

[ˈdeɪzɪ] n (wild) → pratolina, margheritina; (cultivated) → margherita

daisy

(ˈdeizi) plural ˈdaisies noun
a type of small common flower with a yellow centre and usually white petals. The field was full of daisies.

daisy

أُقْحُوان sedmikráska bellis Gänseblümchen μαργαρίτα margarita päivänkakkara pâquerette tratinčica margherita ヒナギク 데이지 madeliefje prestekrage stokrotka margarida ромашка tusensköna ดอกเดซี่ papatya hoa cúc 雏菊
References in classic literature ?
And now he felt like a bird lifted up and borne away upon a gale; he stopped and stared at each new sight of wonder--at a herd of cows, and a meadow full of daisies, at hedgerows set thick with June roses, at little birds singing in the trees.
A haycart had been decked with green vines and bunches of long-stemmed field daisies, those gay darlings of New England meadows.
We'll drink the daisies of the field, in compliment to you; and the lilies of the valley that toil not, neither do they spin, in compliment to me - the more shame for me
I wish we had a little garden, father, with double daisies in, like Mrs.
There is nothing he will not promise the poor hungry human heart, with his innocent-looking daisies and those practised liars the birds.
So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.
The effects of this singular attitude was to separate into two heavy masses the volume of her black hair, which now fell on either side of her head, and allowed the two spectators to admire the white shoulders glistening like daisies in a field, and the throat, the perfection of which allowed them to judge of the other beauties of her figure.
Edward begged for a long while, the maternal kiss probably not offering sufficient recompense for the trouble he must take to obtain it; however at length he decided, leaped out of the window into a cluster of heliotropes and daisies, and ran to his mother, his forehead streaming with perspiration.
the days were so very long among the daisies on a grazing farm, and thought is so active--how was it possible that the inward drama should not get the start of the outward?
Michaelmas was come, with its fragrant basketfuls of purple damsons, and its paler purple daisies, and its lads and lasses leaving or seeking service and winding along between the yellow hedges, with their bundles under their arms.
At the bottom of the sloping garden there is a wicket, which opens upon a lane as green as the lawn, very long, shady, and little frequented; on the turf of this lane generally appear the first daisies of spring--whence its name--Daisy Lane; serving also as a distinction to the house.
I am not dressed yet, Marguerite; but if you wish that we should talk together, we can, without going to the woods of Vincennes, find in my own garden here, beautiful trees, shady groves, a greensward covered with daisies and violets, the perfume of which can be perceived from where we are sitting.