damaging


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dam·age

 (dăm′ĭj)
n.
1. Destruction or a loss in value, usefulness, or ability resulting from an action or event.
2. damages Law Money required to be paid as compensation for an injury or wrong.
3. Informal Cost; price: What's the damage for the tickets to the show?
v. dam·aged, dam·ag·ing, dam·ag·es
v.tr.
To cause damage to.
v.intr.
To suffer or be susceptible to damage.

[Middle English, from Old French : dam, loss (from Latin damnum) + -age, -age.]

dam′age·a·bil′i·ty n.
dam′age·a·ble adj.
dam′ag·ing·ly adv.

dam•ag•ing

(ˈdæm ɪ dʒɪŋ)

adj.
causing or capable of causing damage; harmful; injurious.
[1850–55]
dam′ag•ing•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.damaging - (sometimes followed by `to') causing harm or injury; "damaging to career and reputation"; "the reporter's coverage resulted in prejudicial publicity for the defendant"
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"
2.damaging - designed or tending to discredit, especially without positive or helpful suggestions; "negative criticism"
destructive - causing destruction or much damage; "a policy that is destructive to the economy"; "destructive criticism"

damaging

Translations

damaging

[ˈdæmɪdʒɪŋ] ADJ (gen) → dañino (fig) → perjudicial (to para)

damaging

[ˈdæmɪdʒɪŋ] adj [information] → préjudiciable
to have damaging consequences → avoir des conséquences néfastes
a damaging effect on → un effet néfaste sur
to be damaging to [+ environment, health] → être nuisible à; [+ reputation, career, morale, economy] → être préjudiciable à, être nuisible à

damaging

adjschädlich; remarksabträglich; to be damaging to somebody/somethingsich auf jdn/etw schädigend or schädlich auswirken, schädlich für jdn/etw sein; that was a damaging blow to his pridedas hat seinem Stolz einen empfindlichen Schlag versetzt

damaging

[ˈdæmɪdʒɪŋ] adj damaging (to)nocivo/a (a)

damaging

a. dañino-a, nocivo-a, perjudicial.
References in classic literature ?
You can't SING "Above wonderfully there," because it simply won't go to the tune, without damaging the singer; but it is a most clingingly exact translation of DORT OBEN WUNDERBAR--fits it like a blister.
While Tom was eating his supper, and stealing sugar as opportunity offered, Aunt Polly asked him questions that were full of guile, and very deep -- for she wanted to trap him into damaging revealments.
Habitually obedient to John, I came up to his chair: he spent some three minutes in thrusting out his tongue at me as far as he could without damaging the roots: I knew he would soon strike, and while dreading the blow, I mused on the disgusting and ugly appearance of him who would presently deal it.
He attached no definite meaning to the word that I am aware of, but used it, like his own pretended Christian name, to affront mankind, and convey an idea of something savagely damaging.
I stepped over the great western gate, and passed very gently, and sidling, through the two principal streets, only in my short waistcoat, for fear of damaging the roofs and eaves of the houses with the skirts of my coat.