dame


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Related to dame: DMAE

dame

 (dām)
n.
1. Used formerly as a courtesy title for a woman in authority or a mistress of a household.
2.
a. A married woman; a matron.
b. An elderly woman.
3. Often Offensive Slang A woman.
4. Chiefly British
a. A woman holding a nonhereditary title conferred by a sovereign in recognition of personal merit or service to the country.
b. The wife or widow of a knight.
c. Used as the title for such a woman.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin domina, feminine of dominus, lord, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

dame

(deɪm)
n
1. (Sociology) (formerly) a woman of rank or dignity; lady
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a nun who has taken the vows of her order, esp a Benedictine
3. archaic chiefly Brit a matronly or elderly woman
4. slang chiefly US and Canadian a woman
5. (Theatre) Also called: pantomime dame Brit the role of a comic old woman in a pantomime, usually played by a man
[C13: from Old French, from Latin domina lady, mistress of a household]

Dame

(in Britain) n
1. (Sociology) the title of a woman who has been awarded the Order of the British Empire or any of certain other orders of chivalry
2. (Sociology) the legal title of the wife or widow of a knight or baronet, placed before her name: Dame Judith. Compare Lady

dame

(deɪm)

n.
1. (cap.) (in Britain)
a. the official title of a female member of the Order of the British Empire, equivalent to that of a knight.
b. the official title of the wife of a knight or baronet.
2. (formerly) a form of address to any woman of rank or authority.
3. a matronly woman of advanced age; matron.
4. Slang: Sometimes Offensive. a woman; female.
5. Archaic. the mistress of a household.
6. Archaic. a woman of rank or authority, esp. a female ruler.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin domina, feminine of dominus lord, master]
usage: Definition 4 is sometimes perceived as insulting. The context in which the word is used will usually clarify the intent of the speaker.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dame - informal terms for a (young) womandame - informal terms for a (young) woman  
fille, girl, miss, missy, young lady, young woman - a young woman; "a young lady of 18"
2.dame - a woman of refinementdame - a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"
grande dame - a middle-aged or elderly woman who is stylish and highly respected
madame - title used for a married Frenchwoman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"

dame

noun
1. lady, baroness, dowager, grande dame (French), noblewoman, peeress a Dame of the British Empire
2. (Slang, chiefly U.S. and Canad.) woman, girl, lady, female, bird (slang), maiden (archaic), miss, chick (slang), maid (archaic), gal (slang), lass, lassie (informal), wench (facetious) This is one classy dame you've got yourself here.
Translations
سَيِّدهسَيِّدَه شَريفَه
dámaženská
damekvinde
damamujertía (informal)
női lovagi rang
hefîarkonakona
bobadamamoteris
dāmakundzītesievišķis
kadınkadın şövalye

dame

[deɪm] N
1. Dame (Brit) (= title) título aristocrático para mujeres equivalente a "sir"
2. (esp Brit) (o.f.) → dama f, señora f (Brit) (Theat) personaje de mujer anciana en las pantomimas británicas interpretado por un actor PANTOMIME
3. (US) (o.f.) (= woman) → tía f, gachí f (Sp)

dame

[ˈdeɪm] n
(US) (= woman) → nana f
(THEATRE) (also pantomime dame) → vieille dame f (rôle comique joué par un homme)

dame

n
Dame (Brit) Titel der weiblichen Träger des „Order of the British Empire“
(= old lady)Dame f; Dame Fortune (esp Brit) → Frau Fortuna f
(Theat, in pantomime) → (komische) Alte
(US inf) → Weib nt (inf)

dame

[deɪm] n (title, also) (Am) (fam) → donna, madama; (in pantomime) personaggio comico di donna attempata recitato da un uomo

dame

(deim) noun
1. (the status of) a lady of the same rank as a knight. There were several dames at the royal wedding.
2. (American) a woman.
References in classic literature ?
Also in return for his great kindness in the hour of affliction any one of my artistic works he likes, Noter Dame is the best.
Since the age of fifteen, which was eleven years before, Robert each summer at Grand Isle had constituted himself the devoted attendant of some fair dame or damsel.
Goodwives," said a hard-featured dame of fifty, "I'll tell ye a piece of my mind.
Thus, while the busy dame bustled about the house, or plied her spinning-wheel at one end of the piazza, honest Balt would sit smoking his evening pipe at the other, watching the achievements of a little wooden warrior, who, armed with a sword in each hand, was most valiantly fighting the wind on the pinnacle of the barn.
Well for our northern friend, Dame Isabella's Inquisition wanes in Lima," laughed Don Sebastian.
It would have columns of the deadly parallel--the million dollars' worth of diamonds, or the fancy pet-poodle establishment of a society dame, beside the fate of Mrs.
He was very anxious to testify his appreciation in some way, but he is so diffident he couldn't venture it himself, and so he begged me to buy some little things and give them to you and Dame Phyllis and let him pay for them with- out your ever knowing they came from him -- you know how a delicate person feels about that sort of thing -- and so I said I would, and we would keep mum.
About ten o'clock some twenty ladies were sitting around about the ladies' saloon, quietly reading, sewing, embroidering, and so on, and among them sat a sweet, benignant old dame with round spectacles on her nose and her busy knitting-needles in her hands.
Man has done nothing for her; she has no family to speak of, no money, no education worthy the name, has had no advantages of any sort; but Dame Nature flung herself into the breach and said:--
My ostensible errand on this occasion was to get measured for a pair of shoes; so I discharged that business first, and when it was done, I stepped across the clean and quiet little street from the shoemaker's to the post-office: it was kept by an old dame, who wore horn spectacles on her nose, and black mittens on her hands.
Happily, an inhabitant of the kitchen made more despatch: a lusty dame, with tucked-up gown, bare arms, and fire-flushed cheeks, rushed into the midst of us flourishing a frying-pan: and used that weapon, and her tongue, to such purpose, that the storm subsided magically, and she only remained, heaving like a sea after a high wind, when her master entered on the scene.
Miss Nancy, indeed, had never been to any school higher than Dame Tedman's: her acquaintance with profane literature hardly went beyond the rhymes she had worked in her large sampler under the lamb and the shepherdess; and in order to balance an account, she was obliged to effect her subtraction by removing visible metallic shillings and sixpences from a visible metallic total.