dame

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Related to Dames: games, dams, Damas

dame

 (dām)
n.
1. Used formerly as a courtesy title for a woman in authority or a mistress of a household.
2.
a. A married woman; a matron.
b. An elderly woman.
3. Often Offensive Slang A woman.
4. Chiefly British
a. A woman holding a nonhereditary title conferred by a sovereign in recognition of personal merit or service to the country.
b. The wife or widow of a knight.
c. Used as the title for such a woman.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin domina, feminine of dominus, lord, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

dame

(deɪm)
n
1. (Sociology) (formerly) a woman of rank or dignity; lady
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a nun who has taken the vows of her order, esp a Benedictine
3. archaic chiefly Brit a matronly or elderly woman
4. slang chiefly US and Canadian a woman
5. (Theatre) Also called: pantomime dame Brit the role of a comic old woman in a pantomime, usually played by a man
[C13: from Old French, from Latin domina lady, mistress of a household]

Dame

(in Britain) n
1. (Sociology) the title of a woman who has been awarded the Order of the British Empire or any of certain other orders of chivalry
2. (Sociology) the legal title of the wife or widow of a knight or baronet, placed before her name: Dame Judith. Compare Lady

dame

(deɪm)

n.
1. (cap.) (in Britain)
a. the official title of a female member of the Order of the British Empire, equivalent to that of a knight.
b. the official title of the wife of a knight or baronet.
2. (formerly) a form of address to any woman of rank or authority.
3. a matronly woman of advanced age; matron.
4. Slang: Sometimes Offensive. a woman; female.
5. Archaic. the mistress of a household.
6. Archaic. a woman of rank or authority, esp. a female ruler.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin domina, feminine of dominus lord, master]
usage: Definition 4 is sometimes perceived as insulting. The context in which the word is used will usually clarify the intent of the speaker.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dame - informal terms for a (young) womandame - informal terms for a (young) woman  
fille, girl, miss, missy, young lady, young woman - a young woman; "a young lady of 18"
2.dame - a woman of refinementdame - a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"
grande dame - a middle-aged or elderly woman who is stylish and highly respected
madame - title used for a married Frenchwoman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"

dame

noun
1. lady, baroness, dowager, grande dame (French), noblewoman, peeress a Dame of the British Empire
2. (Slang, chiefly U.S. and Canad.) woman, girl, lady, female, bird (slang), maiden (archaic), miss, chick (slang), maid (archaic), gal (slang), lass, lassie (informal), wench (facetious) This is one classy dame you've got yourself here.
Translations
سَيِّدهسَيِّدَه شَريفَه
dámaženská
damekvinde
damamujertía (informal)
női lovagi rang
hefîarkonakona
bobadamamoteris
dāmakundzītesievišķis
kadınkadın şövalye

dame

[deɪm] N
1. Dame (Brit) (= title) título aristocrático para mujeres equivalente a "sir"
2. (esp Brit) (o.f.) → dama f, señora f (Brit) (Theat) personaje de mujer anciana en las pantomimas británicas interpretado por un actor PANTOMIME
3. (US) (o.f.) (= woman) → tía f, gachí f (Sp)

dame

[ˈdeɪm] n
(US) (= woman) → nana f
(THEATRE) (also pantomime dame) → vieille dame f (rôle comique joué par un homme)

dame

n
Dame (Brit) Titel der weiblichen Träger des „Order of the British Empire“
(= old lady)Dame f; Dame Fortune (esp Brit) → Frau Fortuna f
(Theat, in pantomime) → (komische) Alte
(US inf) → Weib nt (inf)

dame

[deɪm] n (title, also) (Am) (fam) → donna, madama; (in pantomime) personaggio comico di donna attempata recitato da un uomo

dame

(deim) noun
1. (the status of) a lady of the same rank as a knight. There were several dames at the royal wedding.
2. (American) a woman.
References in classic literature ?
The bustle which had been observed by Henrietta Maria and for which she had vainly sought to discover a reason, was occasioned by the battle of Lens, announced by the prince's messenger, the Duc de Chatillon, who had taken such a noble part in the engagement; he was, besides, charged to hang five and twenty flags, taken from the Lorraine party, as well as from the Spaniards, upon the arches of Notre Dame.
It was only known that on the following Sunday a Te Deum would be sung at Notre Dame in honor of the victory of Lens.
Nevertheless, at eight o'clock in the morning the regiment of the queen's guards, commanded by Guitant, under whom was his nephew Comminges, marched publicly, preceded by drums and trumpets, filing off from the Palais Royal as far as Notre Dame, a manoeuvre which the Parisians witnessed tranquilly, delighted as they were with military music and brilliant uniforms.
Let her appear, and speak for herself--the wild and weird grandmother of gentle little Mary; the Sibyl of modern times, known, far and wide, in our part of Suffolk, as Dame Dermody.
A little, lean, wiry old woman was Dame Dermody--with fierce black eyes, surmounted by bushy white eyebrows, by a high wrinkled forehead, and by thick white hair gathered neatly under her old-fashioned "mob-cap.
Dame Dermody's nobler superstition formed an integral part of her religious convictions--convictions which had long since found their chosen resting-place in the mystic doctrines of Emanuel Swedenborg.
Now they lived a very lonely and happy life; and as they had no children themselves, they had adopted a little common snail, which they brought up as their own; but the little one would not grow, for he was of a common family; but the old ones, especially Dame Mother Snail, thought they could observe how he increased in size, and she begged father, if he could not see it, that he would at least feel the little snail's shell; and then he felt it, and found the good dame was right.
In other respects the whole went off very quietly, for the old folks could not bear noise and merriment; but old Dame Snail made a brilliant speech.
Why, good dame," said Alleyne, "I would not offend the customs of your house, but it is only sooth when I say that my purse is a thin one.
I pray you, good dame, to give me those three pigment-pots and the brush, and I shall try whether I cannot better this painting.
I have never lost my old names, nor has he lost his; nor do I ever, when he is with us, sit in any other place than in my old chair at his side, Dame Trot, Dame Durden, Little Woman--all just the same as ever; and I answer, "Yes, dear guardian
My dear Dame Durden," said Allan, drawing my arm through his, "do you ever look in the glass?