dame

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Related to Dames: games, dams, Damas

dame

 (dām)
n.
1. Used formerly as a courtesy title for a woman in authority or a mistress of a household.
2.
a. A married woman; a matron.
b. An elderly woman.
3. Often Offensive Slang A woman.
4. Chiefly British
a. A woman holding a nonhereditary title conferred by a sovereign in recognition of personal merit or service to the country.
b. The wife or widow of a knight.
c. Used as the title for such a woman.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin domina, feminine of dominus, lord, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

dame

(deɪm)
n
1. (Sociology) (formerly) a woman of rank or dignity; lady
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a nun who has taken the vows of her order, esp a Benedictine
3. archaic chiefly Brit a matronly or elderly woman
4. slang chiefly US and Canadian a woman
5. (Theatre) Also called: pantomime dame Brit the role of a comic old woman in a pantomime, usually played by a man
[C13: from Old French, from Latin domina lady, mistress of a household]

Dame

(in Britain) n
1. (Sociology) the title of a woman who has been awarded the Order of the British Empire or any of certain other orders of chivalry
2. (Sociology) the legal title of the wife or widow of a knight or baronet, placed before her name: Dame Judith. Compare Lady

dame

(deɪm)

n.
1. (cap.) (in Britain)
a. the official title of a female member of the Order of the British Empire, equivalent to that of a knight.
b. the official title of the wife of a knight or baronet.
2. (formerly) a form of address to any woman of rank or authority.
3. a matronly woman of advanced age; matron.
4. Slang: Sometimes Offensive. a woman; female.
5. Archaic. the mistress of a household.
6. Archaic. a woman of rank or authority, esp. a female ruler.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin domina, feminine of dominus lord, master]
usage: Definition 4 is sometimes perceived as insulting. The context in which the word is used will usually clarify the intent of the speaker.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dame - informal terms for a (young) womandame - informal terms for a (young) woman  
fille, girl, miss, missy, young lady, young woman - a young woman; "a young lady of 18"
2.dame - a woman of refinementdame - a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"
grande dame - a middle-aged or elderly woman who is stylish and highly respected
madame - title used for a married Frenchwoman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"

dame

noun
1. lady, baroness, dowager, grande dame (French), noblewoman, peeress a Dame of the British Empire
2. (Slang, chiefly U.S. and Canad.) woman, girl, lady, female, bird (slang), maiden (archaic), miss, chick (slang), maid (archaic), gal (slang), lass, lassie (informal), wench (facetious) This is one classy dame you've got yourself here.
Translations
سَيِّدهسَيِّدَه شَريفَه
dámaženská
damekvinde
damamujertía (informal)
női lovagi rang
hefîarkonakona
bobadamamoteris
dāmakundzītesievišķis
kadınkadın şövalye

dame

[deɪm] N
1. Dame (Brit) (= title) título aristocrático para mujeres equivalente a "sir"
2. (esp Brit) (o.f.) → dama f, señora f (Brit) (Theat) personaje de mujer anciana en las pantomimas británicas interpretado por un actor PANTOMIME
3. (US) (o.f.) (= woman) → tía f, gachí f (Sp)

dame

[ˈdeɪm] n
(US) (= woman) → nana f
(THEATRE) (also pantomime dame) → vieille dame f (rôle comique joué par un homme)

dame

n
Dame (Brit) Titel der weiblichen Träger des „Order of the British Empire“
(= old lady)Dame f; Dame Fortune (esp Brit) → Frau Fortuna f
(Theat, in pantomime) → (komische) Alte
(US inf) → Weib nt (inf)

dame

[deɪm] n (title, also) (Am) (fam) → donna, madama; (in pantomime) personaggio comico di donna attempata recitato da un uomo

dame

(deim) noun
1. (the status of) a lady of the same rank as a knight. There were several dames at the royal wedding.
2. (American) a woman.
References in classic literature ?
vous trouverez notre general un brave homme, et bien poli avec les dames.
Of course," she said coldly, "I won't detain you; your business must be urgent, and I forgot--at least I had forgotten until to- day--that you have other duties more important than that of squire of dames.
It were well," muttered the most iron-visaged of the old dames, "if we stripped Madame Hester's rich gown off her dainty shoulders; and as for the red letter which she hath stitched so curiously, I'll bestow a rag of mine own rheumatic flannel to make a fitter one
Hard by the farmhouse was a vast barn, that might have served for a church; every window and crevice of which seemed bursting forth with the treasures of the farm; the flail was busily resounding within it from morning to night; swallows and martins skimmed twittering about the eaves; an rows of pigeons, some with one eye turned up, as if watching the weather, some with their heads under their wings or buried in their bosoms, and others swelling, and cooing, and bowing about their dames, were enjoying the sunshine on the roof.
The starred and stately nights seemed haughty dames in jewelled velvets, nursing at home in lonely pride, the memory of their absent conquering Earls, the golden helmeted suns
And as those ancient dames moved about gaily, though in the jaws of the whale, as you may say; even so, in a shower, with the like thoughtlessness, do we nowadays fly under the same jaws for protection; the umbrella being a tent spread over the same bone.
She holds her skirt with her hand as she dances, with stately precision, after the manner of the grandes dames.
Chez maman," said she, "quand il y avait du monde, je le suivais partout, au salon et e leurs chambres; souvent je regardais les femmes de chambre coiffer et habiller les dames, et c'etait si amusant: comme cela on apprend.
This was the occasion on which fair dames who came on pillions sent their bandboxes before them, supplied with more than their evening costume; for the feast was not to end with a single evening, like a paltry town entertainment, where the whole supply of eatables is put on the table at once, and bedding is scanty.
The feather of an ostrich, fastened in her turban by an agraffe set with brilliants, was another distinction of the beautiful Jewess, scoffed and sneered at by the proud dames who sat above her, but secretly envied by those who affected to deride them.
Nor were their ornaments like those in use to-day, set off by Tyrian purple, and silk tortured in endless fashions, but the wreathed leaves of the green dock and ivy, wherewith they went as bravely and becomingly decked as our Court dames with all the rare and far-fetched artifices that idle curiosity has taught them.
Hark ye, lasses and dames, hark ye, Good meat come buy, come buy, Three pen'orths go for one penny, And a kiss is good, say I