damnation

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dam·na·tion

 (dăm-nā′shən)
n.
1. The act of damning or the condition of being damned.
2.
a. Condemnation to everlasting punishment; doom.
b. Everlasting punishment.
3. Failure or ruination incurred by adverse criticism.
interj.
Used to express anger or annoyance. See Note at tarnation.

damnation

(dæmˈneɪʃən)
n
1. the act of damning or state of being damned
2. a cause or instance of being damned
interj
an exclamation of anger, disappointment, etc

dam•na•tion

(dæmˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of damning or the state of being damned.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.damnation - the act of damningdamnation - the act of damning      
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
2.damnation - the state of being condemned to eternal punishment in Hell
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
fire and brimstone - (Old Testament) God's means of destroying sinners; "his sermons were full of fire and brimstone"

damnation

noun (Theology) condemnation, damning, sending to hell, consigning to perdition She had a healthy fear of hellfire and eternal damnation.

damnation

noun
A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury:
Archaic: malison.
Translations

damnation

[dæmˈneɪʃən]
A. N (Rel) → perdición f
B. EXCL¡maldición!

damnation

[ˌdæmˈneɪʃən]
n (RELIGION)damnation f
exclmerde!

damnation

n (Eccl) (= act)Verdammung f; (= state of damnation)Verdammnis f
interj (inf)verdammt (inf)

damnation

[dæmˈneɪʃn]
1. n (Rel) → dannazione f
2. excl (old) → dannazione!, diavolo!
References in classic literature ?
The colonel, bidden to hear the jarring noises of an engagement in the woods to the left, broke out in vague damnations.
The next thing I saw was that, from outside, he had reached the window, and then I knew that, close to the glass and glaring in through it, he offered once more to the room his white face of damnation.
Yet when I walk with John Barleycorn I suffer all the damnation of intellectual pessimism.