damoiselle


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dam·o·sel

also dam·oi·selle or dam·o·zel  (dăm′ə-zĕl′)
n. Archaic
A young woman; a damsel.

[Middle English damoisele, from Old French damoiselle, damsel; see damsel.]

damoiselle

(ˌdæməˈzɛl) ,

damosel

or

damozel

n
archaic variants of damsel
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.damoiselle - a young unmarried womandamoiselle - a young unmarried woman    
maiden, maid - an unmarried girl (especially a virgin)
References in classic literature ?
One can only see one eye," observed Damoiselle Guillemette; "there is a wart on the other.
From Les fleurs da mal, Debussy selected five poems, and worked on their settings for some two years, from 1887 to 1889, at the same time that he was working on his mystical and even pagan oratorio La damoiselle elue, on a text by the PreRaphaelite poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti.
Foals Gestt Wittekindshof offers the only Galileo foal in the sale, a son of German champion juvenile Nordtanzerin (165), while Haras de Saint Pair sells a Raven's Pass filly out of Prix Eclipse winner Damoiselle (58).
Anne of Austria's maids of honour included Catherine de Monchy (Mouchy), damoiselle d'Ocquincourt (Hauquincourt), who served her from 1618 to 1624, when she married a marechal de France.
His work La Damoiselle elue is a cantata based on the poem The Blessed Damozel by Dante Gabrielle Rossetti.
The 13-strong line-up is completed by Daaly Babet, Damoiselle, Mauralakana and Tie Black.
In the Epistre d'une damoiselle francoise a une sienne amie dame estrangere, a lady-in-waiting of Eleonore de Roye writes of the exemplary death of the twenty-eight-year-old Eleonore, including vivid physical details of her last moments.
bill," Brome, The Damoiselle (1638); Fletcher, The Elder Brother (1625); Randolph, Aristippus (1626); "discharge .
1169, and which refers us to the individual manuscript as a space of play and agon, recurs in other texts collected in the Querelle manuscripts, notably in two poems: (12) L'Echiquier d'amours or Le Debat de la damoiselle et de la bourgoise (13) by Blosseville (this appears in five manuscripts of the cycle), (14) and Comment l'estat du monde puet estre compare au jeu des eschecz (witnessed only by Arsenal, MS 3521)?
De Ternant said that Debussy visited London for a week in 1887 to seek an English publisher for his choral work La Damoiselle elue.
110811-2): Broadcast a few weeks earlier in the spring of 1940, this Debussy compilation (it also includes Iberia, two of the Nocturnes and the pre-Raphaelite La Damoiselle Elue among other offerings) shows Toscan ini building a wonderful palette of colour and excitement from his NBC Symphony Orchestra.