dance


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dance

 (dăns)
v. danced, danc·ing, danc·es
v.intr.
1. To move rhythmically usually to music, using prescribed or improvised steps and gestures.
2. Zoology To perform a specialized set of movements to communicate chiefly with other members of the same species.
3.
a. To move or leap about excitedly.
b. To bob up and down or move about rapidly: The leaves danced in the wind.
c. To appear to flash or twinkle: eyes that danced with merriment.
4. Informal To speak or behave in an evasive or vacillating manner: danced around the issue.
v.tr.
1. To engage in or perform (a dance).
2. To lead (someone) in a dance.
3. To cause to move up and down quickly or lightly: danced the child on her knee.
n.
1.
a. A series of motions and steps, such as the waltz or tango, usually performed to music.
b. The act or an instance of dancing: May I have this dance?
c. The music composed or played for a certain kind of dance or for a particular dance.
d. The art of dancing: studied dance in college.
2. A party or gathering of people for dancing.
3. Zoology An act of communication by dancing: a peacock's courtship dance.
Idiom:
dance attendance on
To attend to or try to please (someone) with eagerness or obsequiousness.

[Middle English dauncen, from Old French danser, perhaps of Germanic origin.]

danc′er n.
danc′ing·ly adv.

dance

(dɑːns)
vb
1. (Dancing) (intr) to move the feet and body rhythmically, esp in time to music
2. (Dancing) (tr) to perform (a particular dance)
3. (intr) to skip or leap, as in joy, etc
4. to move or cause to move in a light rhythmic way
5. dance attendance on someone to attend someone solicitously or obsequiously
n
6. (Dancing) a series of rhythmic steps and movements, usually in time to music.
7. (Dancing) an act of dancing
8. (Dancing)
a. a social meeting arranged for dancing; ball
b. (as modifier): a dance hall.
9. (Music, other) a piece of music in the rhythm of a particular dance form, such as a waltz
10. (Pop Music) short for dance music2
11. (Zoology) dancelike movements made by some insects and birds, esp as part of a behaviour pattern
12. lead someone a dance informal Brit to cause someone continued worry and exasperation; play up
[C13: from Old French dancier]
ˈdanceable adj
ˈdancer n
ˈdancing n, adj

dance

(dæns, dɑns)

v. danced, danc•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to move one's feet or body, or both, rhythmically in a pattern of steps, esp. to the accompaniment of music.
2. to leap, skip, etc., as from excitement or emotion; move nimbly or quickly.
3. to bob up and down: The toy sailboats danced on the pond.
v.t.
4. to perform or take part in (a dance).
5. to cause to dance: He danced her around the room.
6. to cause to be in a specified condition by dancing: She danced her way to stardom.
n.
7. a successive group of rhythmical steps or bodily motions, or both, usu. executed to music.
8. an act or round of dancing; set: May I have this dance?
9. the art of dancing: to study dance.
10. a social gathering or party for dancing; ball.
11. a piece of music suited in rhythm or style to a particular form of dancing.
12. a stylized pattern of movements performed by an animal, as a bird in a courtship display.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French da(u)ncer, Old French dancier, v. of uncertain orig.]
dance′a•ble, adj.
dance`a•bil′i•ty, n.
danc′er, n.

dance


Past participle: danced
Gerund: dancing

Imperative
dance
dance
Present
I dance
you dance
he/she/it dances
we dance
you dance
they dance
Preterite
I danced
you danced
he/she/it danced
we danced
you danced
they danced
Present Continuous
I am dancing
you are dancing
he/she/it is dancing
we are dancing
you are dancing
they are dancing
Present Perfect
I have danced
you have danced
he/she/it has danced
we have danced
you have danced
they have danced
Past Continuous
I was dancing
you were dancing
he/she/it was dancing
we were dancing
you were dancing
they were dancing
Past Perfect
I had danced
you had danced
he/she/it had danced
we had danced
you had danced
they had danced
Future
I will dance
you will dance
he/she/it will dance
we will dance
you will dance
they will dance
Future Perfect
I will have danced
you will have danced
he/she/it will have danced
we will have danced
you will have danced
they will have danced
Future Continuous
I will be dancing
you will be dancing
he/she/it will be dancing
we will be dancing
you will be dancing
they will be dancing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dancing
you have been dancing
he/she/it has been dancing
we have been dancing
you have been dancing
they have been dancing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dancing
you will have been dancing
he/she/it will have been dancing
we will have been dancing
you will have been dancing
they will have been dancing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dancing
you had been dancing
he/she/it had been dancing
we had been dancing
you had been dancing
they had been dancing
Conditional
I would dance
you would dance
he/she/it would dance
we would dance
you would dance
they would dance
Past Conditional
I would have danced
you would have danced
he/she/it would have danced
we would have danced
you would have danced
they would have danced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dance - an artistic form of nonverbal communicationdance - an artistic form of nonverbal communication
art, fine art - the products of human creativity; works of art collectively; "an art exhibition"; "a fine collection of art"
extension - the ability to raise the working leg high in the air; "the dancer was praised for her uncanny extension"; "good extension comes from a combination of training and native ability"
choreography - the representation of dancing by symbols as music is represented by notes
choreograph - compose a sequence of dance steps, often to music; "Balanchine choreographed many pieces to Stravinsky's music"
hoof - dance in a professional capacity
tap dance - perform a tap dance
heel - perform with the heels; "heel that dance"
2.dance - a party of people assembled for dancing
party - a group of people gathered together for pleasure; "she joined the party after dinner"
ball - the people assembled at a lavish formal dance; "the ball was already emptying out before the fire alarm sounded"
3.dance - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to musicdance - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
sidestep - a step to one side (as in boxing or dancing)
diversion, recreation - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates; "scuba diving is provided as a diversion for tourists"; "for recreation he wrote poetry and solved crossword puzzles"; "drug abuse is often regarded as a form of recreation"
adagio - a slow section of a pas de deux requiring great skill and strength by the dancers
break dance, break dancing - a form of solo dancing that involves rapid acrobatic moves in which different parts of the body touch the ground; normally performed to the rhythm of rap music
courante - a court dance of the 16th century; consisted of short advances and retreats
nauch, nautch, nautch dance - an intricate traditional dance in India performed by professional dancing girls
pavan, pavane - a stately court dance of the 16th and 17th centuries
phrase - dance movements that are linked in a single choreographic sequence
saraband - a stately court dance of the 17th and 18th centuries; in slow time
skank - a rhythmic dance to reggae music performed by bending forward and extending the hands while bending the knees
slam dance, slam dancing - a form of dancing in which dancers slam into one another; normally performed to punk rock
hoofing, step dancing - dancing in which the steps are more important than gestures or postures
toe dance, toe dancing - a dance performed on tiptoe
choreography, stage dancing - a show involving artistic dancing
pas seul, variation - (ballet) a solo dance or dance figure
pas de deux, duet - (ballet) a dance for two people (usually a ballerina and a danseur noble)
pas de trois - (ballet) a dance for three people
pas de quatre - (ballet) a dance for four people
social dancing - dancing as part of a social occasion
mambo - a Latin American dance similar in rhythm to the rumba
ceremonial dance, ritual dance, ritual dancing - a dance that is part of a religious ritual
tap - a small metal plate that attaches to the toe or heel of a shoe (as in tap dancing)
performing arts - arts or skills that require public performance
busker - a person who entertains people for money in public places (as by singing or dancing), usually while asking for money
jive - dance to jive music; dance the jive
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
clog - dance a clog dance
tap dance - perform a tap dance
belly dance - perform a belly dance
heel - perform with the heels; "heel that dance"
shimmy - dance a shimmy
4.dance - a party for social dancing
party - an occasion on which people can assemble for social interaction and entertainment; "he planned a party to celebrate Bastille Day"
formal, ball - a lavish dance requiring formal attire
barn dance - a dance party featuring country dancing
record hop, hop - an informal dance where popular music is played
rave - a dance party that lasts all night and electronically synthesized music is played; "raves are very popular in Berlin"
Verb1.dance - move in a graceful and rhythmical way; "The young girl danced into the room"
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
glissade - perform a glissade, in ballet
chasse, sashay - perform a chasse step, in ballet
capriole - perform a capriole, in ballet
2.dance - move in a patterndance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
dancing, terpsichore, dance, saltation - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
jive - dance to jive music; dance the jive
hoof - dance in a professional capacity
clog - dance a clog dance
tap dance - perform a tap dance
belly dance - perform a belly dance
heel - perform with the heels; "heel that dance"
shimmy - dance a shimmy
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
dance - move in a graceful and rhythmical way; "The young girl danced into the room"
bebop, bop - dance the bebop
bump - dance erotically or dance with the pelvis thrust forward; "bump and grind"
twist - do the twist
waltz, waltz around - dance a waltz
tapdance, tap - dance and make rhythmic clicking sounds by means of metal plates nailed to the sole of the dance shoes; "Glover tapdances better than anybody"
tango - dance a tango
shag - dance the shag
foxtrot - dance the foxtrot
break dance, break-dance, break - do a break dance; "Kids were break-dancing at the street corner"
cakewalk - perform the cakewalk dance
conga - dance the conga
samba - dance the samba
two-step - dance the two-step
Charleston - dance the Charleston
boogie - dance to boogie music
cha-cha - dance the cha-cha
disco - dance to disco music
mambo - dance a mambo
polka - dance a polka
one-step - dance the one-step
rhumba, rumba - dance the rhumba
mosh, slam dance, thrash, slam - dance the slam dance
jig - dance a quick dance with leaping and kicking motions
jitterbug - do the jitterbug
folk dance - perform a folk-dance
square dance - dance in formation
quickstep - perform a quickstep
kick - kick a leg up
skank - dance the skank
grind - dance by rotating the pelvis in an erotically suggestive way, often while in contact with one's partner such that the dancers' legs are interlaced
3.dance - skip, leap, or move up and down or sideways; "Dancing flames"; "The children danced with joy"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"

dance

verb
1. prance, rock, trip, swing, spin, hop, skip, sway, whirl, caper, jig, frolic, cavort, gambol, bob up and down, cut a rug (informal) They like to dance to the music on the radio.
2. caper, trip, spring, jump, bound, leap, bounce, hop, skip, romp, frolic, cavort, gambol He danced off down the road.
3. sparkle, move, flash, glitter, wink, shimmer, twinkle, glint, glisten, glister (archaic), scintillate patterns of light dancing on the river
noun
1. ball, social, hop (informal), disco, knees-up (Brit. informal), discotheque, dancing party She often went to dances and parties in the village.
lead someone a merry dance run rings around, mess someone about, lead someone up the garden path The criminals led the police a merry dance.
Related words
adjective Terpsichorean
like choreomania
Quotations
"Dancing is the loftiest, the most moving, the most beautiful of the arts, because it is no mere translation or abstraction from life; it is life itself" [Havelock Ellis The Dance of Life]
"On with the dance! Let joy be unconfined;"
"No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet"
"To chase the glowing hours with flying feet" [Lord Byron Childe Harold's Pilgrimage]
"No sober man dances, unless he happens to be mad" [Cicero Pro Murena]

Dance

Dances  allemande, apache dance, ballroom dance, barn dance, beguine, belly dance, black bottom, body popping, bogle, bolero, boogaloo, boogie, bossa nova, boston, bourrée, branle, brawl, break dance, breakdown, buck and wing, bump, bunny hug, butterfly, cachucha, cakewalk, calypso, cancan, carioca, carmagnole, carol, cha-cha-cha or cha-cha, chaconne, charleston, clog dance, conga, contredanse or contradance, Cossack dance, cotillion, country dance, courante, czardas, Dashing White Sergeant, ecossaise, eightsome reel, excuse-me, fan dance, fandango, farandole, flamenco, folk dance, formation dance, foxtrot, galliard, galop, gavotte, Gay Gordons, german, ghost dance, gigue, gopak, habanera, hay or hey, Highland fling, hoedown, hokey cokey, hora, hornpipe, hula or hula-hula, hustle, jig, jitterbug, jive, jota, juba, kazachok, kolo, lambada, Lambeth walk, lancers, ländler, limbo, macarena, malagueña, mambo, maxixe, mazurka, merengue, minuet, Morisco or Moresco, morris dance, mosh, musette, nautch, old-time dance, one-step, palais glide, paso doble, passacaglia, Paul Jones, pavane, pogo, poi dance, polka, polonaise, pyrrhic, quadrille, quickstep, redowa, reel, rigadoon or rigaudon, ring-shout, robot dancing or robotics, ronggeng, round, round dance, roundelay or roundel, rumba, salsa, saltarello, samba, saraband, saunter, schottische, seguidilla, shake, shimmy, shuffle, siciliano, Sir Roger de Coverley, skank, snake dance, snowball, square dance, step dance, stomp, strathspey, strip the willow, sword dance, tambourin, tango, tap dance, tarantella, toe dance, twist, two-step, Tyrolienne, Virginia reel, vogueing, volta, waltz, war dance, Zapata
General dance steps and terms  chassé, choreography, dosido, glide, grand chain, keep step, in step, out of step, pas, pas de basque, pas seul, phrase, pigeonwing, progressive, promenade, rhythm, routine, score, sequence, set, shuffle, slip step, steps, time

dance

verb
1. To move rhythmically to music, using patterns of steps or gestures:
Slang: hoof.
2. To leap and skip about playfully:
noun
A party or gathering for dancing:
Informal: hop.
Translations
حَفْلَه راقِصَهرقصرَقْصَةرَقْصَهيَرْقُص
tanectančittancovattanečnítaneční zábava
dansedansdanse-gyngebal
dancidanco
tanssitanssia
plesplesati
táncoltánctáncmulatság
dansdansadansleikur, ballhreyfa upp og niîur, hossa
ダンス踊るダンスする舞踊踊り
춤추다
šokdintišokėjasšokiaišokimasšokis
dejadejotdeju-deju vakarsucināt
hojdaťtancovaťtanectanečná zábava
plesplesati
dansdansa
เต้นรำการเต้นรำ
dansdans etmekdansetmekdansı yapmakhoplatmak
nhảy múasự nhảy múa

dance

[dɑːns]
A. N
1. (= act) → baile m; (= art of dancing) → danza f, baile m
dance of deathdanza f de la muerte
to lead sb a (merry) dance (Brit) → traer loco a algn
2. (= event) → baile m
B. VTbailar
to dance attendance on sbdesvivirse por algn
C. VIbailar; (artistically) → bailar, danzar (fig) (= skip) → saltar, brincar
shall we dance?¿quieres bailar?
to dance about (with pain, joy etc) → saltar
to dance for joysaltar or brincar de alegría
to dance to sb's tunebailar al son que algn toca
D. CPD dance band Norquesta f de baile
dance class Nclase f de baile
dance floor Npista f de baile
dance hall Nsalón m de baile, sala f de fiestas
dance music Nmúsica f de baile

dance

[ˈdɑːns]
n
(= series of steps) → danse f
The last dance was a waltz → La dernière danse était une valse.
to lead sb a merry dance (British)donner du fil à retordre à qn
(= ball) → bal m
Are you going to the dance tonight? → Tu vas au bal ce soir?
vidanser
to go dancing → aller danser
Let's go dancing! → Si on allait danser?
to dance with sb → danser avec qn
to dance to music → danser en écoutant de la musique
It's not music to dance to
BUT Ce n'est pas de la musique très dansante.
to dance to sb's tune (= do their bidding) → faire les quatre volontés de qn
vt [+ waltz, tango] → danser
dance about
vise secouer dans tous les sens
dance off
vi (= move away) → s'en aller joyeusement
The samba players danced off to Fort Park → Les joueurs de samba se rendirent à Fort Park en dansant.dance band norchestre mdance company ncompagnie f de dansedance floor npiste f de dansedance hall nsalle f de baldance music ndance music f

dance

n
(= movement)Tanz m; dance classTanzstunde f; the Dance of Deathder Totentanz; may I have the next dance?darf ich um den nächsten Tanz bitten?; she’s led him a merry dancesie hat ihn ja ganz schön an der Nase herumgeführt; (= caused a lot of trouble)ihretwegen hat er sich (dat)die Hacken abgelaufen
(= ball)Tanz m, → Tanzabend m; public danceöffentliche Tanzveranstaltung; end-of-term danceSemesterball m; to give or hold a danceeinen Tanz(abend) veranstalten; (privately) → eine Tanzparty geben; to go to a dancetanzen gehen, zum Tanzen gehen
vttanzen; to dance attendance on somebodyjdn von hinten und vorn bedienen (inf)
vi
(= perform dance)tanzen; would you like to dance?möchten Sie tanzen?
(= move here and there) to dance about(herum)tänzeln; to dance up and downauf- und abhüpfen; to dance for joyeinen Freudentanz aufführen
(fig)tanzen; (boat on waves)schaukeln

dance

in cpdsTanz-;
dance band
nTanzkapelle f
dance floor
nTanzboden m; (in restaurant) → Tanzfläche f
dance hall
nTanzsaal m
dance music
nTanzmusik f

dance

[dɑːns]
1. n (activity) → ballo, danza; (traditional, in ballet) → danza; (event) → ballo, serata danzante
to lead sb a dance (fig) → far girare qn come una trottola
2. vt (waltz, tango) → ballare
to dance attendance on sb → girare intorno a qn
3. viballare, danzare (fig) (flowers, boat on waves) → danzare
will you dance with me? → vuoi ballare (con me)?
to dance about → saltellare
to dance for joy → ballare dalla gioia or dalla contentezza

dance

(daːns) verb
1. to move in time to music by ma-king a series of rhythmic steps. She began to dance; Can you dance the waltz?
2. to move quickly up and down. The father was dancing the baby on his knee.
noun
1. a series of fixed steps made in time to music. Have you done this dance before?; (also adjective) dance music.
2. a social gathering at which people dance. We're going to a dance next Saturday.
ˈdancer noun
a ballet dancer.
ˈdancing noun
She likes dancing; (also adjective) dancing shoes.

dance

رَقْصَة, يَرْقُصُ tančit, tanec dans, danse Tanz, tanzen χορεύω, χορός bailar, baile tanssi, tanssia danse, danser ples, plesati ballare, ballo ダンス, 踊る, 춤추다 dans, dansen dans, danse taniec, zatańczyć dança, dançar танец, танцевать dans, dansa เต้นรำ, การเต้นรำ dans, dans etmek nhảy múa, sự nhảy múa 舞蹈, 跳舞

dance

n. baile;
St. Vitus' ______ de San Vito
V.: chorea;
vt. bailar, danzar.
References in classic literature ?
Gardiner would be happy to see Miss March and Miss Josephine at a little dance on New Year's Eve.
Sometimes she went with her young man to a dance or a church social.
At home he play violin all the time; for weddings and for dance.
A little girl performed a skirt dance in the center of the floor.
Here and there a picket had, indeed, raised a song, or mingled in a dance, which had drawn the dusky savages around them, from their lairs in the forest.
Think of that little one with the curls--I don't believe he is over seventeen, for all his baby moustache--says he's going to build an assembly hall for us to give a dance in next month; and apologizes the next breath to tell us that there isn't any milk to be had nearer than La Grange, and we must do without it, and use syrup in our tea to-morrow.
Jim Crow, moreover, was seen executing his world-renowned dance, in gingerbread.
But while she said it, Pearl laughed, and began to dance up and down with the humoursome gesticulation of a little imp, whose next freak might be to fly up the chimney.
And now the sound of the music from the common room, or hall, summoned to the dance.
The half of them dance to the tambourine; some go below; some sleep or lie among the coils of rigging.
About this time --yes, it is his noon nap now -- the boy vivaciously wakes; sits up in bed; and his mother tells him of me, of cannibal old me; how I am abroad upon the deep, but will yet come back to dance him again.
Sometimes, when I have had less exercise than usual, I have felt so full of life and spring that when John has taken me out to exercise I really could not keep quiet; do what I would, it seemed as if I must jump, or dance, or prance, and many a good shake I know I must have given him, especially at the first; but he was always good and patient.