dancegoer

dance·go·er

 (dăns′gō′ər)
n.
One who attends dance performances.

dance′go′ing adj. & n.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the general dancegoer there may be too much of talking heads, yet learning about these dance-makers and their personal as well as political struggles is valuable.
While a recording may never compete with hearing Kirsten Flagstad or Yehudi Menuhin live, what dancegoer wouldn't love to catch even a glimpse of Edward Villella in Prodigal Son or Nora Kaye in Pillar of Fire?
By inclination, choice and profession, I am an inveterate dancegoer.
Orman was an avid dancegoer and became involved in the dance community through her work.
Because of its proximity to major dance hubs in other parts of Europe, it is able to commission notable choreographers, while capitalizing on Reykjavik's small community of artists and dancegoers.
Ohren encourages dancegoers to buy tickets early so refreshment coordinators know about how many people to expect.
Kristi Capps was the corps dancer who made dancegoers snap to attention when she joined Cincinnati Ballet 12 years ago.
White Bird has helped Portland blossom into a city of passionate dancegoers.
Romeo and Juliet counted on Prokofiev's lush, emotionally manipulative score and bargain-basement grandeur to seduce new dancegoers.
Not surprisingly, Gilliland has created a ripple of excitement among dancegoers and the New York press, including a feature story in The New York Times.
With the use of current technology, companies that tour internationally can now provide an easy way for dancegoers to purchase tickets at venues all over the world, through their Web sites.