dank


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dank

 (dăngk)
adj. dank·er, dank·est
Disagreeably damp or humid: a dank cave.

[Middle English, probably of Scandinavian origin.]

dank′ly adv.
dank′ness n.

dank

(dæŋk)
adj
(esp of cellars, caves, etc) unpleasantly damp and chilly
[C14: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Swedish dank marshy spot]
ˈdankly adv
ˈdankness n

dank

(dæŋk)

adj. -er, -est.
unpleasantly moist or humid; damp and, often, chilly: a dank cellar.
[1350–1400; Middle English, probably < Scandinavian]
dank′ly, adv.
dank′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dank - unpleasantly cool and humid; "a clammy handshake"; "clammy weather"; "a dank cellar"; "dank rain forests"
wet - covered or soaked with a liquid such as water; "a wet bathing suit"; "wet sidewalks"; "wet weather"

dank

adjective damp, dripping, moist, soggy, clammy, dewy The kitchen was dank and cheerless.

dank

adjective
Slightly wet:
Translations
kostea

dank

[dæŋk] ADJ (danker (compar) (dankest (superl))) → húmedo y oscuro

dank

[ˈdæŋk] adj [room, air] → froid(e) et humide

dank

adj(unangenehm) feucht

dank

[dæŋk] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) → freddo/a e umido/a
References in classic literature ?
The skies they were ashen and sober; The leaves they were crisped and sere -- The leaves they were withering and sere; It was night in the lonesome October Of my most immemorial year: It was hard by the dim lake of Auber, In the misty mid region of Weir: -- It was down by the dank tarn of Auber, In the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir.
A FARMER of the Augustan age Perused in Virgil's golden page, The story of the secret won From Proteus by Cyrene's son How the dank sea-god sowed the swain Means to restore his hives again More briefly, how a slaughtered bull Breeds honey by the bellyful.
Ere the moon has climbed the mountain, ere the rocks are ribbed with light, When the downward-dipping trails are dank and drear, Comes a breathing hard behind thee--snuffle-snuffle through the night-- It is Fear, O Little Hunter, it is Fear!
Gone, gone, sold and gone To the rice swamp dank and lone, Where the slave-whip ceaseless swings, Where the noisome insect stings, Where the fever-demon strews Poison with the falling dews, Where the sickly sunbeams glare Through the hot and misty air:-- Gone, gone, sold and gone To the rice swamp dank and lone, From Virginia hills and waters-- Woe is me, my stolen daughters
There by the counsel of Zeus who drives the clouds the Titan gods are hidden under misty gloom, in a dank place where are the ends of the huge earth.
All around the dank, nauseous odour of poison flowers, the ceaseless dripping of poisonous moisture.
After two hours of futile, light-headed, inconsequent thinking upon all things under heaven in that dark, dank, wet and devastated cabin, I arose suddenly and staggered up on deck.
These dank walls had known the man whose dolorous story is a sealed book forever
For untold ages, oppressed by protean fear, I am aware of wandering, endlessly wandering, through a dank and soggy wilderness, where poisonous snakes struck at us, and animals roared around us, and the mud quaked under us and sucked at our heels.
White, wet clouds, which swept by in ghostly fashion, so dank and damp and cold that it needed but little effort of imagination to think that the spirits of those lost at sea were touching their living brethren with the clammy hands of death, and many a one shuddered at the wreaths of sea-mist swept by.
As it advanced, the mender of roads would discern without surprise, that it was a shaggy-haired man, of almost barbarian aspect, tall, in wooden shoes that were clumsy even to the eyes of a mender of roads, grim, rough, swart, steeped in the mud and dust of many highways, dank with the marshy moisture of many low grounds, sprinkled with the thorns and leaves and moss of many byways through woods.
For the most part it was a silent forest, lush and dank, where only occasionally a wood-pigeon cooed or snow- white cockatoos laughed harshly in laborious flight.