danse macabre


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danse macabre

(dɑ̃s makɑbrə)
n
(Art Terms) another name for dance of death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.danse macabre - a medieval dance in which a skeleton representing death leads a procession of others to the gravedanse macabre - a medieval dance in which a skeleton representing death leads a procession of others to the grave
ceremonial dance, ritual dance, ritual dancing - a dance that is part of a religious ritual
Translations
haláltánc
References in classic literature ?
Gounod had conducted the Funeral March of a Marionnette; Reyer, his beautiful overture to Siguar; Saint Saens, the Danse Macabre and a Reverie Orientale; Massenet, an unpublished Hungarian march; Guiraud, his Carnaval; Delibes, the Valse Lente from Sylvia and the Pizzicati from Coppelia.
A musical prodigy, he is best-known for works including Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso (1863), the Second Piano Concerto (1868), the First Cello Concerto (1872), Danse Macabre (1874), the opera Samson and Delilah (1877), the Third Violin Concerto (1880), the Third ("Organ") Symphony (1886) and The Carnival of the Animals (1886).
As a result of her dedication and hard work, this week, at the age of 12, she is preparing to compete in her first British Championships where she will be skating to Danse Macabre by Saint-Saens.
Other highlights included Wagner's Flying Dutchman overture, and Saint-Saens' famous Danse Macabre, with Malloy telling the story over the orchestra.
Borough Organist Gordon Stewart is at the console of the Huddersfield Town Hall organ for a concert of Halloween-inspired music, including Saint-Saens Danse Macabre and Suite Gothique by Boellmann.
Still, they clearly know their strengths: this and the other conventionally "serious" piece - Saint-Saens' Danse Macabre, stylishly shaded, with gutsy fiddle solos from leader Cristinel Bacanu - were the two items in which the BPO seemed most at ease.
Let me recommend to you "Mothers and Marimbas in 'The Bight': Bishop's Danse Macabre," which excellently exemplifies not a superior kind of critical writing so much as a basic one: close reading.
One of these, an eight-screen danse macabre, which gives the exhibition its title, offers a ghostly enquiry into solitude and death, making use of Kentridge's trademark silhouettes.
I have selected three early depictions of the printing press on which to focus (although other depictions will also be introduced where necessary to flesh out the argument): the famous danse macabre set in a printing shop, part of a set of danses macabres published by Mathias Huss in 1499; (4) the printer's devices (also called marks) depicting a printing press that were used by Josse Bade, commonly known as Badius, in the first three decades of the sixteenth century (1507, 1520, and 1529); and Albrecht Durer's 1511 drawing of a printing press.
She won the Arthur Ellis Award for Best Mystery Story, and several awards for her dark fantasy writing and editing, including the Paris Book Festival's Best Anthology of the Year for Danse Macabre.
Chapter Three focuses on an exploration of how manuscripts formed part of the visual medieval world, for example the displaying of the now lost Danse macabre at St Paul's Cathedral, which John Stow's Survey of London corroborates.
Her shadow remains clearly etched on the pavement where she used to walk, in a kind of death march, in a simulacrum of the danse macabre, back and forth, back and forth, so as to soak up the last of the sunlight, to breathe in the last sweet draft of life.