darkness


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dark

 (därk)
adj. dark·er, dark·est
1.
a. Lacking or having very little light: a dark corner.
b. Lacking brightness: a dark day.
c. Reflecting only a small fraction of incident light; tending toward black: dark clothing.
d. Served without milk or cream: dark coffee.
2. Being or having a complexion that is not light in color.
3. Sullen or threatening: a dark scowl.
4.
a. Characterized by gloom or pessimism; dismal or bleak: a dark day for the economy; dark predictions of what lies in store.
b. Being or characterized by morbid or grimly satiric humor.
5.
a. Unknown or concealed; mysterious: a dark secret; the dark workings of the unconscious.
b. Lacking enlightenment, knowledge, or culture: a dark age in the history of education.
6.
a. Evil in nature or effect; sinister: "churned up dark undercurrents of ethnic and religious hostility" (Peter Maas).
b. Morally corrupt; vicious: dark deeds; a dark past.
7. Having richness or depth: a dark, melancholy vocal tone.
8. Not giving performances; closed: The movie theater is dark on Mondays.
9. Linguistics Pronounced with the back of the tongue raised toward the velum. Used of the sound (l) in words like full.
n.
1. Absence of light.
2. A place having little or no light.
3. Night; nightfall: home before dark.
4. A deep hue or color.
5. darks Pieces of laundry having a dark color.
Idiom:
in the dark
1. In secret: high-level decisions made in the dark.
2. In a state of ignorance; uninformed: kept me in the dark about their plans.

[Middle English derk, from Old English deorc.]

dark′ish adj.
dark′ly adv.
dark′ness n.
Synonyms: dark, dim, murky, dusky, shady, shadowy
These adjectives indicate the absence of light or clarity. Dark, the most widely applicable, can refer to a lack or near lack of illumination (a dark night), deepness of shade or color (dark brown), somberness (a dark mood), or immorality (a dark past). Dim means having or producing little light (dim shadows; a dim light bulb) and further suggests lack of sharpness or clarity: "the terrible dim faces known in dreams" (Carson McCullers)."tales now dim and half forgotten" (Jane Stevenson).
Murky refers to a thick or clouded darkness: "Dolphins use sonar beams to navigate the murky depths of the ocean" (Tim Hilchey).
Like dim, it is also used of what is indistinct or uncertain: "Modern warfare is murky, and with no clear frontlines, the distinction between combat and support can become meaningless" (Kristin Henderson).
Dusky suggests a subdued half-light: "The dusky night rides down the sky, / And ushers in the morn" (Henry Fielding).
It can also refer to deepness or darkness of color: "A dusky blush rose to her cheek" (Edith Wharton).
Shady refers literally to what is sheltered from light, especially sunlight (a shady grove of pines) or figuratively to what is of questionable honesty (shady business deals). Shadowy also implies obstructed light (an ill-lit, shadowy street) but may refer to what is indistinct or little known: "[He] retreated from the limelight to the shadowy fringe of music history" (Charles Sherman).
It can also refer to something that seems to lack substance and is mysterious or sinister: a shadowy figure in a black cape.

dark•ness

(ˈdɑrk nɪs)

n.
1. the state or quality of being dark.
2. absence or deficiency of light: the darkness of night.
3. wickedness or evil: the forces of darkness.
4. obscurity; concealment.
5. lack of knowledge or enlightenment.
6. lack of sight; blindness.
[before 1050]

Darkness


an abnormal fear of darkness. Also called scotophobia.
1. the state or condition of being sooty or smoky.
2. soot or smoke. — fuliginous, adj.
any thing or creature that shines or glows in the dark, especially a phosphorescent or bioluminescent marine or other organism. — noctilucine, adj.
an abnormal love of the night.
an abnormal fear of darkness or night.
Rare. the act or process of darkening or obscuring.
an abnormal fear of shadows.
achluophobia.
vision in dim light or darkness. See also photopia. — scotopic, adj.

Darkness

 
  1. Dark and cool as a cave —David Huddle
  2. Dark and heavy like a surface stained with ink —John Ashbery
  3. (It was) dark as a closet —Niven Busch
  4. Dark as a dungeon —Anon

    The simile is the title of a ballad from the American South.

  5. Dark as anger —Sylvia Plath
  6. Dark as a pocket —American colloquialism, attributed to Vermont
  7. (All was) dark as a stack of black cats —J. S. Rioss
  8. Dark as a thundercloud —Steven Vincent Benet
  9. Dark as a troll —W. D. Snodgrass
  10. Dark as a wolfs mouth —Miguel de Cervantes

    “Dark as” and “Black as” have been used interchangeably since the simile’s appearance in Don Quixote.

  11. Dark as a womb —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  12. Dark as blackberries —Marge Piercy
  13. (The room was) dark as dreamless sleep —Harry Prince
  14. (Eyelashes … ) dark as night —Lord Byron
  15. Dark as sin —Mark Twain
  16. Dark as the devil’s mouth —Walter Scott
  17. Dark as the inside of a coffin —Gavin Lyall
  18. Dark as the inside of a magician’s hat —Robert Campbell
  19. Dark as the inside of a cow —Mark Twain
  20. Dark as the river bottom —Paige Mitchell
  21. Dark like wet coffee grounds —Ella Leffland
  22. The darkness ahead … looked like Alaska —Richard North
  23. Darkness as deep and cold as Siberian midnight —Gerald Kersh
  24. Darkness [in a rainstorm] came closer … like a sodden velvet curtain —Frank Swinnerton
  25. Darkness falls like a wet sponge —John Ashbery

    This is the opening line of an Ashbery poem entitled The Picture of Little J.A. in a Prospect of Flowers.

  26. Darkness fell like a swift blow —James Crumley
  27. Darkness fills her like a carbohydrate —Daniela Gioseffi
  28. The darkness flew in like an unwelcome bird —Norman Garbo
  29. Darkness had begun to come in like water —Alice McDermott
  30. Darkness hanging over them like a blotter —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  31. Darkness like a black lake —Erich Maria Remarque
  32. Darkness … like a warm liquid poured from the throat of an enormous bird —John Hawkes
  33. Darkness settling down round them like a soft bird —Rose Tremain
  34. Darkness should be a private matter, like thought, like emotion —William Dieter
  35. Darkness so total it seemed … like deep water —William Boyd
  36. The darkness was like a rising tide that covered the gardens and the houses, erasing everything as a still sea erased footprints on a beach —John P. Marquand
  37. Darkness was sinking down over the region like a veil —Thomas Mann
  38. The darkness was thin, like some sleazy dress that has been worn and worn for many winters and always lets the cold through to the bones —Eudora Welty
  39. Dim as a cave of the sea —Richard Wilbur
  40. Dim as a cellar in midafternoon —Joyce Cary
  41. Dim as an ill-lit railroad coach —Natascha Wodin
  42. (My sun has set, I) dwell in darkness as a dead man out of sight —Christina Rossetti
  43. Light … drained out of the windows like a sink —William H. Gass
  44. So dark and murky it [a movie, The Fugitive Kind,] looked like everyone was drowning in chocolate syrup —Tennessee Williams, quoted in interview with Rex Reed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.darkness - absence of light or illuminationdarkness - absence of light or illumination  
illumination - the degree of visibility of your environment
night - darkness; "it vanished into the night"
lightlessness, pitch blackness, total darkness, black, blackness - total absence of light; "they fumbled around in total darkness"; "in the black of night"
brownout, dimout, blackout - darkness resulting from the extinction of lights (as in a city invisible to enemy aircraft)
semidarkness - partial darkness
2.darkness - an unilluminated area; "he moved off into the darkness"
scene - the place where some action occurs; "the police returned to the scene of the crime"
3.darkness - absence of moral or spiritual values; "the powers of darkness"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
foulness - disgusting wickedness and immorality; "he understood the foulness of sin"; "his display of foulness deserved severe punishment"; "mouths which speak such foulness must be cleansed"
4.darkness - an unenlightened state; "he was in the dark concerning their intentions"; "his lectures dispelled the darkness"
unenlightenment - a lack of understanding
5.darkness - having a dark or somber color
value - relative darkness or lightness of a color; "I establish the colors and principal values by organizing the painting into three values--dark, medium...and light"-Joe Hing Lowe
lightness - having a light color
6.darkness - a swarthy complexion
complexion, skin color, skin colour - the coloring of a person's face

darkness

noun
1. dark, shadows, shade, gloom, obscurity, blackness, murk, dimness, murkiness, duskiness, shadiness The room was plunged into darkness.
2. night, dark, dusk, nightfall, night-time, hours of darkness They worked all evening until darkness fell.
Related words
fear achluophobia

darkness

noun
Absence or deficiency of light:
Translations
ظُلْمَةظُلْمَه، ظَلام
temnotatma
mørke
pimeys
obscuritéténèbre
tama
dimma, myrkurmyrkur
暗さ
암흑어둠
tamsa
tema
mörker
ความมืด
bóng tối

darkness

[ˈdɑːknɪs] N
1. (= blackness) [of complexion, hair, sky] → oscuridad f
in the darkness of the nighten la oscuridad or lo oscuro de la noche
the house was in darknessla casa estaba a oscuras
darkness fell, and we returned homecayó la noche y volvimos a casa
2. (= evil) → el mal
the forces of darknesslas fuerzas del mal
the powers of darknesslos poderes del mal

darkness

[ˈdɑːrknɪs] nobscurité f
The room was in darkness → La chambre était dans l'obscurité.
to be plunged into darkness → être plongé(e) dans l'obscurité

darkness

n
(lit)Dunkelheit f; (of night)Finsternis f, → Dunkelheit f; in total darknessin totaler or völliger Dunkelheit, in tiefem Dunkel (geh); the house was in darknessdas Haus lag im Dunkeln
(fig: = sinisterness) → Finsterkeit f
(fig: = gloominess, sadness) → Düsterkeit f

darkness

[ˈdɑːknɪs] noscurità, buio; (of hair) → colore m scuro
the house was in darkness → la casa era immersa nel buio or nell'oscurità

dark

(daːk) adjective
1. without light. a dark room; It's getting dark; the dark (= not cheerful) side.
2. blackish or closer to black than white. a dark red colour; a dark (= not very white or fair) complexion; Her hair is dark.
3. evil and usually secret. dark deeds; a dark secret.
noun
absence of light. in the dark; afraid of the dark; He never goes out after dark; We are in the dark (= we have no knowledge) about what is happening.
ˈdarken verb
to make or become dark or darker.
ˈdarkness noun
the state of being dark.
keep it dark
to keep something a secret. They're engaged to be married but they want to keep it dark.

darkness

ظُلْمَة temnota mørke Dunkelheit σκότος oscuridad, tinieblas pimeys obscurité tama oscurità 暗さ 어둠 duisternis mørke ciemność escuridão темнота mörker ความมืด karanlık bóng tối 黑暗

dark·ness

n. oscuridad.
References in classic literature ?
She opened with hospitable haste, and started as if another ghost had come to surprise her, for there stood a tall bearded gentleman, beaming on her from the darkness like a midnight sun.
As he ran away into the darkness they re- pented of their weakness and ran after him, swear- ing and throwing sticks and great balls of soft mud at the figure that screamed and ran faster and faster into the darkness.
Ned, who was walking along in the darkness, clapped his open hand down on Tom's magazine he was carrying home to read again, and the resultant noise was a sharp crack.
I couldn't see any town, or even distant lights; we were surrounded by utter darkness.
The little stinging, buzzing imps succeeded in dispelling a mood which might have held her there in the darkness half a night longer.
At length the sun set in a flood of glory, behind the distant western hills, and as darkness drew its veil around the secluded spot the sounds of preparation diminished; the last light finally disappeared from the log cabin of some officer; the trees cast their deeper shadows over the mounds and the rippling stream, and a silence soon pervaded the camp, as deep as that which reigned in the vast forest by which it was environed.
She stopped, and found herself blushing even in the darkness.
Because no man can ever feel his own identity aright except his eyes be closed; as if darkness were indeed the proper element of our essences, though light be more congenial to our clayey part.
We were clear from the carcase; sail had been made; the wind was freshening; the wild ocean darkness was intense.
IN the stillness and the darkness, realization soon began to supplement knowledge.
But now the mist, helped by the evening darkness, was more of a screen than he desired, for it hid the ruts into which his feet were liable to slip--hid everything, so that he had to guide his steps by dragging his whip along the low bushes in advance of the hedgerow.
Ah, to descend, to descend into that pit of darkness every entrance to which was closed to him,.