dasheen


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Related to dasheen: callaloo

da·sheen

(dă-shēn′)
n. Caribbean
1. A variety of taro having large yellowish corms.
2. The corm of this plant.

[Antillean English Creole, from Antillean French Creole (Martinique) dachine, from French (chou) de Chine, literally, (cabbage) from China (from the fact that the taro species Colocasia esculenta originates in Asia).]

dasheen

(dæˈʃiːn)
n
(Plants) another name for taro
[C19: perhaps changed from French (chou) de Chine (cabbage) of China]

ta•ro

(ˈtɑr oʊ, ˈtɛər oʊ, ˈtær oʊ)

n., pl. -ros.
1. a stemless plant, Colocasia esculenta, of the arum family, cultivated in tropical regions for its edible tuber.
2. the tuber itself.
[1770–80; < Polynesian]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dasheen - edible starchy tuberous root of taro plantsdasheen - edible starchy tuberous root of taro plants
Colocasia esculenta, dalo, taro plant, dasheen, taro - herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves
root - (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground
2.dasheen - herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leavesdasheen - herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves
edda, taro root, cocoyam, dasheen, taro - tropical starchy tuberous root
aroid, arum - any plant of the family Araceae; have small flowers massed on a spadix surrounded by a large spathe
Colocasia, genus Colocasia - small genus of perennial tuberous herbs of tropical Asia: taro
cocoyam, dasheen, eddo, taro - edible starchy tuberous root of taro plants
3.dasheen - tropical starchy tuberous rootdasheen - tropical starchy tuberous root  
root vegetable - any of various fleshy edible underground roots or tubers
poi - Hawaiian dish of taro root pounded to a paste and often allowed to ferment
Colocasia esculenta, dalo, taro plant, dasheen, taro - herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves
References in periodicals archive ?
Families cultivate corn (Zea mays), the most important crop, in addition to beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), dasheen (Colocasia esculenta), bananas and plantains (Musa spp.
by her Indian husband, a doctor, who takes out her heart and stitches her back up, whose "head, her face protruding from the brown burlap coconut bag, gnawed open perhaps by the very fish that had nibbled away her eyes, lips and tongue" (Nunez 5), and that of Melda, a black woman, who is cut up and fed to the hogs, "a carcass chopped into tiny bits and mingled with food in their trough, with the remains of dasheen, cassava yam and rotting potatoes" (39).
NRs: Dasheen, Enjoy Life, Avalanche, Stamp Of Authority.
When you plant dasheen and you use your water, no chemical, you are more healthy.
Lady Gillespie's last success under rules was recorded a little more than a month ago, when Dasheen won a 7f handicap under Billy Lee at Tipperary on his first start for the stable, which McAllistar said had provided Gillespie with a boost.
Lucia and Dominica where banana and dasheen production stood out as areas for production expansion respectively.
et al, A polymerase chain reaction method adapted for selective cloning of 30 non translated regions of potyviruses: application to dasheen mosaic virus.
05pm Dasheen TOMORROW'S NAP: Rosy Morning (Pontefract 4.
Follow the locals for inex-pensive, tasty one-pot dishes of broth or pilau rice, with exotic veg like christophine, dasheen and breadfruit - washed down with cherry, golden apple or sorrel juice.
Go down to the roti shop on Flatbush Avenue and pick me up some more dasheen bush (taro plant leaves from Southeast Asia)
Each page depicts an array of dragonflies, dasheen leaves, meadow flowers, cowbells, butterflies, lizards and colourful clothing.
1977) (denying liability against the seller of a recipe book that failed to warn that an ingredient--the Dasheen plant, also known as "elephant's ears"--was poisonous if consumed raw, to avoid imposing strict liability on booksellers); see also Winter v.