dating


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date 1

 (dāt)
n.
1.
a. The time stated in terms of the day, month, and year: What is the date of your birth?
b. A statement of calendar time, as on a document.
2.
a. A particular point or period of time at which something happened or existed, or is expected to happen: the date of their wedding.
b. dates The years of someone's birth and death: Beethoven's dates were 1770 to 1827.
3. The time during which something lasts; duration: "Summer's lease hath all too short a date" (Shakespeare).
4. The time or historical period to which something belongs: artifacts of a later date.
5. An appointment: a luncheon date with a client. See Synonyms at engagement.
6.
a. An engagement to go out socially with another person, often out of romantic interest.
b. One's companion on such an outing.
7. An engagement for a performance: has four singing dates this month.
v. dat·ed, dat·ing, dates
v.tr.
1. To mark or supply with a date: date a letter.
2. To determine the date of: date a fossil.
3. To betray the age of: Pictures of old cars date the book.
4. To go on a date or dates with.
v.intr.
1. To have origin in a particular time in the past: This statue dates from 500 bc.
2. To become old-fashioned.
3. To go on dates.
Idioms:
out of date
No longer in style; old-fashioned: clothes that went out of date last year.
to date
Until now: To date, only half of those invited have responded.
up to date
In or into accordance with current information, styles, or technology: brought me up to date on the project's status.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin data, from Latin data (Romae), issued (at Rome) (on a certain day), feminine past participle of dare, to give; see dō- in Indo-European roots.]

dat′a·ble, date′a·ble adj.
dat′er n.

date 2

 (dāt)
n.
1. The sweet, edible, oblong or oval fruit of the date palm, containing a narrow, hard seed.
2. A date palm.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Old Provençal datil, from Latin dactylus, from Greek daktulos, finger, date (from its shape).]

dating

(ˈdeɪtɪŋ)
n
(Chemistry) any of several techniques, such as radioactive dating, dendrochronology, or varve dating, for establishing the age of rocks, palaeontological or archaeological specimens, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dating - use of chemical analysis to estimate the age of geological specimens
chemical analysis, qualitative analysis - the act of decomposing a substance into its constituent elements
potassium-argon dating - geological dating that relies on the proportions of radioactive potassium in a rock sample and its decay product, argon
carbon dating, carbon-14 dating, radiocarbon dating - a chemical analysis used to determine the age of organic materials based on their content of the radioisotope carbon-14; believed to be reliable up to 40,000 years
rubidium-strontium dating - geological dating based on the proportions of radioactive rubidium into its decay product strontium; radioactive rubidium has a half-life of 47,000,000,000 years
Translations
datagedatation

dating

[ˈdeɪtɪŋ]
A. N (Archeol) → datación f
B. CPD dating agency Nagencia f de contactos
dating service Nservicio m de contactos

dating

[ˈdeɪtɪŋ] adj [service] → de rencontres; [show] → de rencontres entre inconnusdating agency nagence f de rencontresdating service nservice m de rencontres
References in classic literature ?
They flanked opposite ends of the house and were probably architectural absurdities, redeemed in a measure indeed by not being wholly disengaged nor of a height too pretentious, dating, in their gingerbread antiquity, from a romantic revival that was already a respectable past.
2] "Jerusalem, my happy home," anonymous hymn dating from the latter part of the sixteenth century, sung to the tune of "St.
They would clear out without waiting to part their hair, and I could take my own time about dating the explosion.
The cellar, indeed, was filled with crazy lumber, mostly dating from the times of the surgeon who was Jekyll's predecessor; but even as they opened the door they were advertised of the uselessness of further search, by the fall of a perfect mat of cobweb which had for years sealed up the entrance.
The result will be that I shall go to the king, with whom I am on tolerably good terms, to whom I have been happy enough to render certain services dating from a period when you were not born, and who at my request, has just sent me an order in blank for M.
If the caligraphy be Poe's, it is different in all essential respects from all the many specimens known to us, and strongly resembles that of the writer of the heading and dating of the manuscript, both of which the contributor of the poem acknowledges to have been recently added.
This was the case more specifically with a phenomenon at last quite frequent for him in the upper rooms, the recognition - absolutely unmistakeable, and by a turn dating from a particular hour, his resumption of his campaign after a diplomatic drop, a calculated absence of three nights - of his being definitely followed, tracked at a distance carefully taken and to the express end that he should the less confidently, less arrogantly, appear to himself merely to pursue.
Setting aside these entirely new forms of life, the plateau was very rich in known prehistoric forms, dating back in some cases to early Jurassic times.
Badger gave us in the drawing-room a biographical sketch of the life and services of Captain Swosser before his marriage and a more minute account of him dating from the time when he fell in love with her at a ball on board the Crippler, given to the officers of that ship when she lay in Plymouth Harbour.
Upon this score he was so jealous of austerity and reserve, that when the Dame de Beaujeu, the king's daughter, came to visit the cloister of Notre-Dame, in the month of December, 1481, he gravely opposed her entrance, reminding the bishop of the statute of the Black Book, dating from the vigil of Saint-Barthélemy,
William Carey had prided himself on never destroying anything, and there were piles of correspondence dating back for fifty years and bundles upon bundles of neatly docketed bills.
HIGGINS [unconsciously dating herself by the word] A problem.