daubed


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daub

 (dôb)
v. daubed, daub·ing, daubs
v.tr.
1. To cover or smear with a soft adhesive substance such as plaster, grease, or mud.
2. To apply paint to (a surface) with hasty or crude strokes.
3. To apply with quick or crude strokes: daubed glue on the paper.
v.intr.
1. To apply paint or coloring with crude, unskillful strokes.
2. To make crude or amateurish paintings.
3. To daub a sticky material.
n.
1. The act or a stroke of daubing.
2. A soft adhesive coating material such as plaster, grease, or mud.
3. Matter daubed on.
4. A crude, amateurish painting or picture.

[Middle English dauben, from Old French dauber, from Latin dēalbāre, to whitewash : dē-, intensive pref.; see de- + albus, white; see albho- in Indo-European roots.]

daub′er n.
daub′er·y (dô′bə-rē) n.
References in classic literature ?
An artist friend fitted her out with his castoff palettes, brushes, and colors, and she daubed away, producing pastoral and marine views such as were never seen on land or sea.
By-and-by, one group after another came straggling back to the mouth of the cave, panting, hilarious, smeared from head to foot with tallow drippings, daubed with clay, and entirely delighted with the success of the day.
I had remarked on one side of the road, at intervals of six or seven yards, a line of upright stones, continued through the whole length of the barren: these were erected and daubed with lime on purpose to serve as guides in the dark, and also when a fall, like the present, confounded the deep swamps on either hand with the firmer path: but, excepting a dirty dot pointing up here and there, all traces of their existence had vanished: and my companion found it necessary to warn me frequently to steer to the right or left, when I imagined I was following, correctly, the windings of the road.
He still wore the fine broadcloth suit in which he had fulfilled his mission, but it was bitterly the worse for wear, daubed with clay and torn with the sharp briers of the wood.
But before this, they had daubed my face and both my hands with a sort of ointment, very pleasant to the smell, which, in a few minutes, removed all the smart of their arrows.
The elder woman grew pale beneath the coarse powder that daubed her cheeks, and her dry lips twitched with a spasm of pain.
However, when we got to the pathway outside the chruchyard, where there was a puddle of water, remaining from the storm, I daubed my feet with mud, using each foot in turn on the other, so that as we went home, no one, in case we should meet any one, should notice my bare feet.
The entire surface of this metallic enclosure was rudely daubed in all the hideous and repulsive devices to which the charnel superstition of the monks has given rise.
The canoe was between thirty and forty feet long, and several feet in width; constructed of birch bark, sewed with fibres of the roots of the spruce tree, and daubed with resin of the pine, instead of tar.
He maintained to his companion that the shallow painted mansion resembled a false house, a "wing" or structure of daubed canvas, on the stage; but she answered him so well with certain economical palaces she had seen in Germany, where, as she said, there was nothing but china stoves and stuffed birds, that he was obliged to allow the home of Washington to be after all really gemuthlich.
But yet, since princes will have such things, it is better they should be graced with elegancy, than daubed with cost.
This paste in the tin is no doubt the luminous mixture with which the creature was daubed.