dawdle

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daw·dle

 (dôd′l)
v. daw·dled, daw·dling, daw·dles
v.intr.
1. To take more time than necessary: dawdled through breakfast.
2. To move aimlessly or lackadaisically: dawdling on the way to work.
v.tr.
To waste (time) by idling: dawdling the hours away.

[Perhaps alteration of dialectal daddle, to diddle.]

daw′dler n.
daw′dling·ly adv.

dawdle

(ˈdɔːdəl)
vb
1. (intr) to be slow or lag behind
2. (when: tr, often foll by away) to waste (time); trifle
[C17: of uncertain origin]
ˈdawdler n

daw•dle

(ˈdɔd l)

v. -dled, -dling. v.i.
1. to waste time; idle; trifle; loiter.
2. to saunter.
v.t.
3. to waste (time) by or as if by trifling (usu. fol. by away): We dawdled away the whole morning.
[1650–60; variant of daddle to toddle]
daw′dler, n.
syn: See loiter.

dawdle


Past participle: dawdled
Gerund: dawdling

Imperative
dawdle
dawdle
Present
I dawdle
you dawdle
he/she/it dawdles
we dawdle
you dawdle
they dawdle
Preterite
I dawdled
you dawdled
he/she/it dawdled
we dawdled
you dawdled
they dawdled
Present Continuous
I am dawdling
you are dawdling
he/she/it is dawdling
we are dawdling
you are dawdling
they are dawdling
Present Perfect
I have dawdled
you have dawdled
he/she/it has dawdled
we have dawdled
you have dawdled
they have dawdled
Past Continuous
I was dawdling
you were dawdling
he/she/it was dawdling
we were dawdling
you were dawdling
they were dawdling
Past Perfect
I had dawdled
you had dawdled
he/she/it had dawdled
we had dawdled
you had dawdled
they had dawdled
Future
I will dawdle
you will dawdle
he/she/it will dawdle
we will dawdle
you will dawdle
they will dawdle
Future Perfect
I will have dawdled
you will have dawdled
he/she/it will have dawdled
we will have dawdled
you will have dawdled
they will have dawdled
Future Continuous
I will be dawdling
you will be dawdling
he/she/it will be dawdling
we will be dawdling
you will be dawdling
they will be dawdling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dawdling
you have been dawdling
he/she/it has been dawdling
we have been dawdling
you have been dawdling
they have been dawdling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dawdling
you will have been dawdling
he/she/it will have been dawdling
we will have been dawdling
you will have been dawdling
they will have been dawdling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dawdling
you had been dawdling
he/she/it had been dawdling
we had been dawdling
you had been dawdling
they had been dawdling
Conditional
I would dawdle
you would dawdle
he/she/it would dawdle
we would dawdle
you would dawdle
they would dawdle
Past Conditional
I would have dawdled
you would have dawdled
he/she/it would have dawdled
we would have dawdled
you would have dawdled
they would have dawdled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.dawdle - take one's time; proceed slowly
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
2.dawdle - waste time; "Get busy--don't dally!"
behave, act, do - behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"
3.dawdle - hang (back) or fall (behind) in movement, progress, development, etc.
follow - to travel behind, go after, come after; "The ducklings followed their mother around the pond"; "Please follow the guide through the museum"
drop behind, get behind, hang back, trail, drop back, drag - to lag or linger behind; "But in so many other areas we still are dragging"

dawdle

verb
1. waste time, potter, trail, lag, idle, loaf, hang about, dally, loiter, dilly-dally (informal), drag your feet or heels They dawdled arm in arm past the shopfronts.
waste time fly, rush, hurry, hasten, scoot, lose no time, get a move on (informal), step on it (informal), make haste
2. linger, idle, dally, take your time, procrastinate, drag your feet or heels I dawdled over a beer.

dawdle

verb
1. To go or move slowly so that progress is hindered:
2. To pass (time) without working or in avoiding work.Also used with away:
fiddle away, idle (away), kill, trifle away, waste, while (away), wile (away).
Translations
يَتَلَكَّأ، يَتَسَكَّع، يَتَباطَأ
lelkovatloudat se
daskesmøle
slóra, hangsa
gaišlysgaišuotilaiko gaišinimas
slaistīties

dawdle

[ˈdɔːdl]
A. VI (in walking) → andar muy despacio; (over food, work) → entretenerse, demorarse
B. VT to dawdle awaymalgastar

dawdle

[ˈdɔːdəl] vitraîner, lambiner
to dawdle over sth
I dawdled over a beer → J'ai bu ma bière en traînassant.
to dawdle over one's work → traînasser sur son travail, lambiner sur son travail
to dawdle over doing sth → traîner pour faire qch

dawdle

vi (= be too slow)trödeln; (= stroll)bummeln; to dawdle on the wayunterwegs trödeln; to dawdle over one’s workbei der Arbeit bummeln or trödeln

dawdle

[ˈdɔːdl] vi (in walking) → ciondolare, bighellonare
to dawdle over one's work → gingillarsi con il lavoro

dawdle

(ˈdoːdl) verb
to waste time especially by moving slowly. Hurry up, and don't dawdle!
ˈdawdler noun
ˈdawdling noun
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Dawdlers like the leisurely lady of Parkinson's description are not few in our days.