day-neutral

day-neu·tral

(dā′no͞o′trəl, -nyo͞o′-)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a plant that flowers regardless of the duration of daylight.

day-neutral

adj
(Botany) (of plants) having an ability to mature and bloom that is not affected by day length
References in periodicals archive ?
New Hampshire's strawberry season traditionally lasts only four to six weeks, but researchers working on the multi-state TunnelBerries project were picking day-neutral strawberries in Durham last November.
Aromas is considered a day-neutral photoperiod plant with uniform and medium-sized fruits.
Day-neutral (sometimes known as "everbearing") strawberries should be planted in early spring and will produce from July through October.
June-bearing varieties bear one crop in early summer; ever-bearing types produce a crop in early summer and one in fall; and day-neutral varieties ripen in early summer and continue to produce through fall.
A third category that does not react to day length is called day-neutral.
If space is limited, stick to day-neutral varieties.
Day-neutral plants differ in that they produce a full crop the first season they ire planted.
Seascape strawberries are day-neutral, meaning they are not sensitive to the length of available daylight to flower.
Day-neutral plants determine flower initiation solely by the genotype and have no specific light requirement.
The lines were derived from day-neutral selections from crosses of cultivars with day-length sensitive primitive race accessions (Percival, 1987).
A light-insensitive gene from a Rocky Mountain strawberry species was transferred into the new varieties, making them day-neutral.
Day-neutral strawberries, also called "ever-bearing" strawberries, flower and fruit when temperatures are between 35 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit.