daydreaming


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day·dream

 (dā′drēm′)
n.
A dreamlike musing or fantasy while awake, especially of the fulfillment of wishes or hopes.
intr.v. day·dreamed or day·dreamt (-drĕmt′), day·dream·ing, day·dreams
To have dreamlike musings or fantasies while awake.

day′dream′er n.

daydreaming

(ˈdeɪˌdriːmɪŋ)
n
indulgence in daydreams
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.daydreaming - absentminded dreaming while awakedaydreaming - absentminded dreaming while awake  
dreaming, dream - imaginative thoughts indulged in while awake; "he lives in a dream that has nothing to do with reality"

daydreaming

noun
The condition of being so lost in solitary thought as to be unaware of one's surroundings:
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
But half the Brummies surveyed said they use daydreaming to help improve their performance and motivation at work.
DAYDREAMING could help beat stress and land you a better job - with two in three workers claiming it keeps their brain sharp.
London, May 13 ( ANI ): Workers in the UK spend more than 16 minutes daydreaming each day, which totals to about an entire working week wasted every year, a new research has said.
She said: "I'm still a huge believer in daydreaming.
BEING bored at work can have a positive effect because daydreaming can increase creativity, according to a new study.
Daydreaming is roller skating backwards to a couples' songwith a red jean banana bag--alone, not thinking--tons of lights on iodine--looking walls.
Daydreaming about what you'd do if you were rolling in dough won't get you anywhere.
Clumsy, graceful, safe, threatened, heroic, pathetic, svelte, chubby, serious, silly, volatile, calm--each of these pieces evokes states one has known at one time or another, looking in the mirror, walking down the street, or daydreaming.
If the antics of daydreaming, soccer-playing Baldo Bermudez suggest some of the mischief of Cantu's teen years, the character's actual look is patterned after Castellanos' younger brother.
Camelot chief executive Dianne Thompson said that daydreaming provided escape from the pressures of modern life.
Next, Cinderella is caught daydreaming in the kitchen and is subjected to a vicious attack of hair-pulling from her stepsisters; later, the toes of one sister are chopped off by the stepmother, anxious to see her fit the spangled slipper.
It revolved around an unstable temperament that featured sharp ups and downs in emotion, relentless pursuit of activities and work, and intense self-absorption fueling a penchant for daydreaming.