daylight-saving time


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day·light-sav·ing time

(dā′līt-sā′vĭng) or day·light-sav·ings time (-vĭngz)
n. Abbr. DST
Time during which clocks are set one hour or more ahead of standard time to provide more daylight at the end of the working day during late spring, summer, and early fall.

daylight-saving time

n
(Horology) time set usually one hour ahead of the local standard time, widely adopted in the summer to provide extra daylight in the evening. Also called (in the US): daylight time See also British Summer Time

day′light-sav′ing

(or day′light-sav′ings) time`,


n.
the time observed when daylight saving is adopted in a community.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.daylight-saving time - time during which clocks are set one hour ahead of local standard timedaylight-saving time - time during which clocks are set one hour ahead of local standard time; widely adopted during summer to provide extra daylight in the evenings
time - the continuum of experience in which events pass from the future through the present to the past
Translations

daylight-saving time

[ˌdeɪlaɪtˈseɪvɪŋˌtaɪm] N (US) → horario m de verano

daylight-saving time

[ˈdeɪlaɪtˈseɪvɪŋtaɪm] n (Am) → ora legale
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 to propose that California remain on daylight-saving time year round.
I have a better chance of figuring out Einstein's theory of relativity or why the Dodgers can't win with all that talent than I do at figuring out daylight-saving time.
Last year in the New England Journal of Medicine, psychologist Stanley Coren of the University of British Columbia reported that traffic accidents increased 7 percent the day after daylight-saving time began.
Bernie & Phyl's Survey Finds Most Respondents Will Take Advantage Of The End Of Daylight-Saving Time By Sleeping In; Only 11% Will Stay Out Later Saturday Night
Daylight-saving time may be an artificial scheme to save energy, but over the past four decades it has worked its way into many of our internal body clocks.
LAST YEAR'S energy bill extended daylight-saving time (DST) by a month, on the theory that it would encourage Americans to save energy.
This year, the kickoff date to the annual hour loss of sleep begins three weeks earlier, when daylight-saving time begins at 2 a.
Congress, in an effort to get us all to use less energy, passed a law two years ago adding four weeks to our daylight-saving time regimen.
Starting in 2007, daylight-saving time begins March 11 (rather than April 1) and ends Nov.
The effects of a plan to extend daylight-saving time by four weeks is unclear, according to a Denver Post editorial.
He is quick to point out that, for the 60,000,000 Americans who suffer from sleep debt, daylight-saving time isn't the culprit.
In a vote in early December, the Chamber of Deputies approved preliminary steps to allow Mexico to implement daylight-saving time in 2002, but it failed to pass the legislation to make the time change official.