daylights


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Related to daylights: Living Daylights

day·light

 (dā′līt′)
n.
1. The light of day; sunlight.
2.
a. Dawn: at work before daylight.
b. Daytime.
3. Exposure to public notice: corrupt business practices that were finally brought to daylight.
4. Understanding or insight into what was formerly obscure: new evidence that gave the researchers some daylight into the matter.
5. Sports An opening, as between defensive players, especially one providing an opportunity for action: The running back found some daylight and gained six yards.
6. daylights Slang One's wits: "His adventurism had scared the daylights out of them" (Frederick Forsyth).
Idiom:
see daylight
To make sufficient progress so that completion of a project seems possible.

daylights

(ˈdeɪˌlaɪts)
pl n
consciousness or wits (esp in the phrases scare, knock, or beat the (living) daylights out of someone)
References in classic literature ?
Make 'm get right down and pull the daylights out of each other
It was night in the streets, and the lamps were sparkling everywhere; the broad bases and shoulders of the mountains were in a deep gloom, but their summits swam in a strange rich glow which was really daylight, and yet had a mellow something about it which was very different from the hard white glare of the kind of daylight I was used to.
I had seen moonlight and daylight together before, but I had not seen daylight and black night elbow to elbow before.
We could see saw-logs go by in the daylight some- times, but we let them go; we didn't show ourselves in daylight.
And if it had only hap- pened to be night he would not have seen that speck of daylight and would not have explored that passage any more
Then let your worship lead the way," said Sancho, "perhaps it may be so; though I see it with my eyes and touch it with my hands, I'll believe it as much as I believe it is daylight now.
As I was to learn, the Martian nights are extremely cold, and as there is practically no twilight or dawn, the changes in temperature are sudden and most uncomfortable, as are the transitions from brilliant daylight to darkness.
We must, therefore, profit by their fears; but we shall await daylight before acting, and then we can form our plans of rescue according to circumstances.
The stone fell, and daylight was visible, brilliant, radiant, flooding the cavern through the opening, and the blue sea appeared to the delighted Bretons.
Now he suddenly saw those badly daubed pictures in clear daylight and without a glass.
Hello, Olaf, you're my meat, savvee that," said the one called Daylight.
By daylight alone; after nightfall no human being except passing strangers ever went near the place.