days


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Related to days: Days of the week

days

 (dāz)
adv.
During the daytime on every day or most days: She works days and sings in a band at night.

days

(deɪz)
adv
informal during the day, esp regularly: he works days.

days

(deɪz)

adv.
in or during the day regularly: I work nights and sleep days.
[1125–75]

days

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.days - the time during which someone's life continuesdays - the time during which someone's life continues; "the monarch's last days"; "in his final years"
life - the period from the present until death; "he appointed himself emperor for life"
Translations
napoknappal
zileziua

days

adv (esp US) → tagsüber
Days   
References in classic literature ?
they would not go back to the seven days for all they could see.
They plodded days upon days and without end over the soft, unpacked snow.
In journeying eastward he had gone towards the sun, and the days therefore diminished for him as many times four minutes as he crossed degrees in this direction.
It's just a week," I said, three days later, to Arthur, "since we heard of Lady Muriel's engagement.
From Gibraltar, running along the coasts of Spain and France, Marseilles will be reached in three days.
Observe all this until the year is ended and you have nights and days of equal length, and Earth, the mother of all, bears again her various fruit.
One day, when he was away hunting, the woman fell ill, and in a few days she died.
In the course of the three following days they made about sixty- three miles, generally in a northwest direction.
The Indians plundered us of what we had, and kept us in confinement seven days, treating us with common savage usage.
Which is to say, he had a curiosity to know what prison life was like; so he made a breach in some law and got three days for it.
If news was received one day that the enemy had been in a certain position the day before, by the third day when something could have been done, that army was already two days' march farther on and in quite another position.
After the coming of freedom there were two points upon which practically all the people on our place were agreed, and I found that this was generally true throughout the South: that they must change their names, and that they must leave the old plantation for at least a few days or weeks in order that they might really feel sure that they were free.