dazedness

dazedness

(ˈdeɪzɪdnəs; ˈdeɪzdnəs)
n
the condition of being dazed
References in periodicals archive ?
When you walk around experiencing the dazedness that seems to persist everywhere--not just in the Lower Ninth Ward, however much it is fetishized as the locus of catastrophe--you sense that the city is open also in the sense of agape, like a mouth.
As someone clearly on his way to thudding encounters with personal mortality (as an evident early-stage sufferer from Alzheimer's disease), Gardner Church appears most to echo the dazedness of Woolf's Mrs.
Though secondary deverbal derivation in Middle English was attested rather seldom its productivity from past participle and passive modal adjectives exceeded that from present participle and deverbal adjective: advise 1297, advised 1325 (8), advisedly 1375 (15), advisedness 1400 (16); note 1225, notable 1340 (7), notably 1380 (13), notability 1380 (14); daze 1325, dazed 1325 (8), dazedly 1300 (15), dazedness 1340 (16); blame 1200, blameful 1386 (5), blamefully 1400 (9), blamefulness 1400 (10); sigh 1300, sighing 1440 (6), sighingly 1402 (11), sighingness* 1300 (12) There were pairs of secondary deverbatives that never got combined in Middle English.
And then old snowbirds and white hound-looking faces, guys with Wobbly cards from an earlier time, old Bohunk women with letters explaining what was wanted, and all varieties of assaulted kissers, infirmity, drunkenness, dazedness, innocence, limping, crawling, insanity, prejudice, and from downright leprosy the whole way again to the most vigorous straight-backed beauty.